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We’ll know whether Johnny Manziel will win the Cleveland Browns‘ starting job by Week 1 prior to August 23.
Manziel and Brian Hoyer are set to lock horns for the Browns’ starting quarterback job, and head coach Mike Pettine told the Akron Beacon Journal that he will pick a starter prior to the team’s third preseason game, even if the exact date isn’t yet known. 

“Yeah, it’s definitely still up in the air,” Pettine said. “It could be sooner, and that’s something we’re going to discuss in that meeting. It’ll be before the third preseason game. I just don’t have a date. I don’t know if I’ll set a date and kind of paint ourselves into a date, but it will be sooner than the third preseason game.”

[ Smack talk season is back at Yahoo Sports: Sign up and play free Fantasy Football!]
Pettine said he still isn’t sure how he’ll split the reps with the first-team offense prior to then between Hoyer, who has taken the majority of the starter’s reps so far in the offseason, and Manziel, the hot-shot rookie who leads the NFL in jersey sales before ever taking a meaningful snap.
“Haven’t had that discussion yet [with offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan and quarterbacks coach Dowell Loggains],” Pettine said. “I talked to them today, and they’re kind of gathering their thoughts. We’re going to meet tomorrow about it as well. …
“We want to make it as open and fair a competition as we can, but you’ve got to be careful then, too, because you’ve got a guy that’s potentially your starter, and you have supporting-cast issues whether that’s in a preseason game or whether you can control it a little better in practice. Then the issue that I talked about before is kind of finding that sweet spot date [for naming a starter].”
The best football player will win the job. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a concern with Manziel’s off-field distractions, and Pettine said he has talked to Manziel following a slew of public photos that didn’t cast the rookie in the best of lights.
“I’ve talked to him,” Pettine said. “I don’t think I used the phrase ‘tone it down.’ I don’t want to get into specifics of the conversation, but I’m comfortable with where we are and what we’ve talked about and I’m comfortable heading into training camp that he knows where I stand.”
Pettine said that Manziel responded positively and isn’t worried about the rookie partying too much.
“Yeah, moving forward, once we get into the season, I feel good that way,” Pettine said. “I know players are going to go out during the season, but I doubt it’ll be to the extent that we’ve seen.
“It was a positive conversation.”
The conversation for one of these guys — the one where Pettine tells them who is starting Sept. 7 at Pittsburgh — isn’t going to go over as well.
- – - – - – -
Eric Edholm is a writer for Shutdown Corner on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at edholm@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter! 
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We’ll know whether Johnny Manziel will win the Cleveland Browns‘ starting job by Week 1 prior to August 23.

Manziel and Brian Hoyer are set to lock horns for the Browns’ starting quarterback job, and head coach Mike Pettine told the Akron Beacon Journal that he will pick a starter prior to the team’s third preseason game, even if the exact date isn’t yet known. 

“Yeah, it’s definitely still up in the air,” Pettine said. “It could be sooner, and that’s something we’re going to discuss in that meeting. It’ll be before the third preseason game. I just don’t have a date. I don’t know if I’ll set a date and kind of paint ourselves into a date, but it will be sooner than the third preseason game.”

[ Smack talk season is back at Yahoo Sports: Sign up and play free Fantasy Football!]

Pettine said he still isn’t sure how he’ll split the reps with the first-team offense prior to then between Hoyer, who has taken the majority of the starter’s reps so far in the offseason, and Manziel, the hot-shot rookie who leads the NFL in jersey sales before ever taking a meaningful snap.

“Haven’t had that discussion yet [with offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan and quarterbacks coach Dowell Loggains],” Pettine said. “I talked to them today, and they’re kind of gathering their thoughts. We’re going to meet tomorrow about it as well. …

“We want to make it as open and fair a competition as we can, but you’ve got to be careful then, too, because you’ve got a guy that’s potentially your starter, and you have supporting-cast issues whether that’s in a preseason game or whether you can control it a little better in practice. Then the issue that I talked about before is kind of finding that sweet spot date [for naming a starter].”

The best football player will win the job. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a concern with Manziel’s off-field distractions, and Pettine said he has talked to Manziel following a slew of public photos that didn’t cast the rookie in the best of lights.

“I’ve talked to him,” Pettine said. “I don’t think I used the phrase ‘tone it down.’ I don’t want to get into specifics of the conversation, but I’m comfortable with where we are and what we’ve talked about and I’m comfortable heading into training camp that he knows where I stand.”

Pettine said that Manziel responded positively and isn’t worried about the rookie partying too much.

“Yeah, moving forward, once we get into the season, I feel good that way,” Pettine said. “I know players are going to go out during the season, but I doubt it’ll be to the extent that we’ve seen.

“It was a positive conversation.”

The conversation for one of these guys — the one where Pettine tells them who is starting Sept. 7 at Pittsburgh — isn’t going to go over as well.

- – - – - – -

Eric Edholm is a writer for Shutdown Corner on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at edholm@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter!

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Colombia’s James Rodriguez is pictured during their 2014 World Cup quarter-finals against Brazil at the Castelao arena in Fortaleza July 4, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Marcelo Del Pozo/Files
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Colombia’s James Rodriguez is pictured during their 2014 World Cup quarter-finals against Brazil at the Castelao arena in Fortaleza July 4, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Marcelo Del Pozo/Files

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/casting-net-mcconaughey-in-talks-to-play-cia-agent-turned-enemy-inside-movies-ew-com/
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• Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey has reportedly signed on to play former CIA agent Edwin Wilson in The Company Man. The film, written by Andrew Cypiot, will tell the true story of Wilson, who was convicted in 1983 of illegally selling weapons to Libya, but had all charges overturned in 2003 after years of imprisonment. The True Detective Emmy nominee is said to also be in the process of finding a director for the film. [Deadline]
• Sandra Bullock is about to throw one big Tupperware party. The Oscar winner will star as Brownie Wise in Tupperware Unsealed, based on writer Bob Kealing’s non-fiction book about the marketing maven who created the Tupperware home party strategy, thus making the household item a household name. The Help director Tate Taylor will write and direct the film for Sony Pictures. [The Wrap]
• Michael Caine has joined Vin Diesel and Rose Leslie (Game of Thrones) in the supernatural action film The Last Witch Hunter. Based on a pitch by Cory Goodman (Priest), the film follows an immortal witch hunter partnering with his natural enemy, a female witch, to stop a plague on humanity. Breck Eisner (Sahara) will direct for Lionsgate, with a script by Matt Sazama (Gods of Egypt) and the additional help of D.W. Harper (Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters)and Melisa Wallack (Dallas Buyers Club). [THR]
• Naomi Watts is in talks to join Jake Gyllenhaal for Dallas Buyers Club director Jean-Marc Vallee‘s next film, Demolition. Watts would play a single mother who begins a relationship with Gyllenhaal’s character, a young investment banker struggling to deal with the tragic death of his wife. Bryan Sipe (Alpha Mail) will pen the script. [The Wrap]
• Idris Elbamay reunite with his RocknRolla director Guy Ritchie for Knights of the Roundtable: King Arthur. The reimagining of the English myth from Warner Brothers will feature a script from Joby Harold (Awake) with the title role yet to be cast. The Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom star will reportedly play Bedivere, Arthur’s father’s right-hand man who teaches the future King to lead an army. [THR]
• Former TV wrestling diva Trish Stratus and veteran Canadian actor Saul Rubinek (Unforgiven) have both joined the cast of the Canadian action-thriller Gridlocked from director Allan Ungar (Tapped Out), playing a lead SWAT team member and Hollywood agent respectively. [THR]
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/casting-net-mcconaughey-in-talks-to-play-cia-agent-turned-enemy-inside-movies-ew-com/
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• Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey has reportedly signed on to play former CIA agent Edwin Wilson in The Company Man. The film, written by Andrew Cypiot, will tell the true story of Wilson, who was convicted in 1983 of illegally selling weapons to Libya, but had all charges overturned in 2003 after years of imprisonment. The True Detective Emmy nominee is said to also be in the process of finding a director for the film. [Deadline]

• Sandra Bullock is about to throw one big Tupperware party. The Oscar winner will star as Brownie Wise in Tupperware Unsealed, based on writer Bob Kealing’s non-fiction book about the marketing maven who created the Tupperware home party strategy, thus making the household item a household name. The Help director Tate Taylor will write and direct the film for Sony Pictures. [The Wrap]

• Michael Caine has joined Vin Diesel and Rose Leslie (Game of Thrones) in the supernatural action film The Last Witch Hunter. Based on a pitch by Cory Goodman (Priest), the film follows an immortal witch hunter partnering with his natural enemy, a female witch, to stop a plague on humanity. Breck Eisner (Sahara) will direct for Lionsgate, with a script by Matt Sazama (Gods of Egypt) and the additional help of D.W. Harper (Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters)and Melisa Wallack (Dallas Buyers Club). [THR]

• Naomi Watts is in talks to join Jake Gyllenhaal for Dallas Buyers Club director Jean-Marc Vallee‘s next film, Demolition. Watts would play a single mother who begins a relationship with Gyllenhaal’s character, a young investment banker struggling to deal with the tragic death of his wife. Bryan Sipe (Alpha Mail) will pen the script. [The Wrap]

• Idris Elbamay reunite with his RocknRolla director Guy Ritchie for Knights of the Roundtable: King Arthur. The reimagining of the English myth from Warner Brothers will feature a script from Joby Harold (Awake) with the title role yet to be cast. The Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom star will reportedly play Bedivere, Arthur’s father’s right-hand man who teaches the future King to lead an army. [THR]

• Former TV wrestling diva Trish Stratus and veteran Canadian actor Saul Rubinek (Unforgiven) have both joined the cast of the Canadian action-thriller Gridlocked from director Allan Ungar (Tapped Out), playing a lead SWAT team member and Hollywood agent respectively. [THR]

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By Anton Zverev and Peter Graff
DONETSK Ukraine Tue Jul 22, 2014 2:29pm IST



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By Anton Zverev and Peter Graff DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) – A train carrying the remains of many of the nearly 300 victims of the Malaysia Airlines plane downed over Ukraine arrived in Ukrainian government territory on Tuesday as a separatist leader…
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1 of 3. A train carrying the remains of the victims of Malaysia Airlines MH17 downed over rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine arrives in the city of Kharkiv in eastern Ukraine July 22, 2014. Almost 300 people were killed when the Malaysia Airlines plane went down on July 17.
Credit: Reuters/Gleb Garanich


 
DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) – A train carrying the remains of many of the nearly 300 victims of the Malaysia Airlines plane downed over Ukraine arrived in Ukrainian government territory on Tuesday as a separatist leader handed over the plane’s black boxes to Malaysian experts.

The train carrying around 200 body bags arrived in the eastern city of Kharkiv, which is in Ukrainian government hands. The bodies will then be taken back to the Netherlands to be identified.

The train left the crash site after the Malaysian prime minister agreed with the separatists for recovered bodies to be handed over to authorities in the Netherlands, where two thirds of the victims came from.

The handover and reports by international investigators of improved access to the wreckage of the airliner four days after it was shot down, came amid calls for broader sanctions against Russia for its support for the rebellion, although Western leaders are struggling to agree on a response.

Early on Tuesday, senior separatist leader Aleksander Borodai handed over the black boxes in the city of Donetsk.

“Here they are, the black boxes,” Borodai told journalists at the headquarters of his self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic as an armed rebel placed the boxes on a desk.

Colonel Mohamed Sakri of the Malaysian National Security Council said the two black boxes were “in good condition”.

Shaken by the deaths of 298 people from around the world,Western governments have threatened Russia with stifferpenalties for what they say is its backing of pro-Russianmilitia who, their evidence suggests, shot the plane down.

At the United Nations, the Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution demanding those responsible “be held toaccount and that all states cooperate fully with efforts toestablish accountability”.

It also demanded that armed groups allow “safe, secure, fulland unrestricted access” to the crash site.

“We owe it to the victims and their families to determine what happened and who was responsible,” said Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop. Australia lost 28 citizens in the crash.

The Kremlin said on Monday that President Vladimir Putin spoke to Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte by telephone, with both giving a “high assessment of the resolution passed by the U.N. Security Council on the investigation into the catastrophe.”

Meanwhile, European Union foreign ministers were scheduled on Tuesday to discuss further penalties against Russia, but the most they are expected to do is to speed up implementation of sanctions against individuals, and possibly companies, agreed in principle last week before the plane was brought down.

France is under pressure from Washington and London over plans to deliver a second helicopter carrier to Russia.

Diplomats say more serious sanctions against whole sectorsof the Russian economy will depend largely on the line taken bythe Dutch, because of the high number of Dutch victims. “It is clear that Russia must use her influence on theseparatists to improve the situation on the ground,” the Dutch prime minister said.

‘WHAT ARE THEY TRYING TO HIDE?’

U.S. President Barack Obama said it was time for Putin and Russia “to pivot away from the strategy that they’ve been taking and get serious about trying to resolve hostilities within Ukraine.”

He said Putin and Russia had a direct responsibility to compel separatists to cooperate with the investigation, and that the burden was on Moscow to insist that separatists stop tampering with the probe, he said.

“What are they trying to hide?” Obama said at the White House.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott described what was happening at the scene as a cover-up.

“After the crime, comes the cover-up. What we have seen is evidence tampering on an industrial scale and obviously that has to stop,” Abbott told reporters in Canberra on Tuesday.

Russia’s Defence Ministry has challenged Western accusations that pro-Russian separatists were responsible for shooting down the airliner and said Ukrainian warplanes had flown close to it.

The ministry also rejected accusations that Russia had supplied the rebels with SA-11 Buk anti-aircraft missile systems – the weapon said by Kiev and the West to have downed the airliner – “or any other weapons”.

Putin said the downing of the airliner must not be used for political ends and urged separatists to allow international experts access to the crash site.

His ambassador to Malaysia said the rebels did not trust the Ukrainian government and that was why they did not want to hand over the black boxes to them.

“This situation is quite unique, the area is a war zone. I think the international community should be flexible about that and act in a way acceptable to all sides,” Lyudmila Vorobyeva said in a news conference.

The International Air Transport Association said governments should take the lead in reviewing how risk assessments for airspace are made after airlines called for a summit to discuss the downing of the airliner.

RECOVERY EFFORTS

European security monitors said gunmen stopped theminspecting the site when they arrived on Friday, and Ukrainianofficials said separatists had tampered with vital evidence.

But the spokesman for the European security monitors saidthey had unfettered access on Monday, and three members of aDutch disaster victims identification team arrived at a railwaystation near the crash site and inspected the storage of thebodies in refrigerated rail cars.

Peter van Vliet, whose team went through the wagons dressedin surgical masks and rubber gloves, said he was impressed bythe work the recovery crews had done, given the heat and thescale of the crash site. “I think they did a hell of a job in ahell of a place,” he said.

As they went about their work, fighting flared in Donetsk,some 60 km (40 miles) from the site, in a reminder ofthe dangers the experts face operating in a war zone.

Four people were killed in clashes, health officials said.

The rebels’ military commander Igor Strelkov said on hisFacebook page up to 12 of his men died in Monday’s fighting.

(Additional reporting by Pavel Polityuk, Natalia Zinets and Elizabeth Piper in Kiev, Jim Loney, Doina Chiacu, Ayesha Rascoe and Mark Hosenball in Washington, Michelle Nichols at the United Nations, Allison Lampert in Montreal, Lincoln Feast and Matt Siegel in Sydney, Al-Zaquan Amer Hamzah, Anuradha Raghu and Trinna Leong in Kuala Lumpur; William James in London, Julien Ponthus, Elizabeth Pineau and Emmanuel Jarry in Paris, and Gabriela Baczynska in Kiev; Writing by Anna Willard; Editing by Giles Elgood)


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DONETSK Ukraine Tue Jul 22, 2014 2:29pm IST

A train carrying the remains of the victims of Malaysia Airlines MH17 downed over rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine arrives in the city of Kharkiv in eastern Ukraine July 22, 2014. Almost 300 people were killed when the Malaysia Airlines plane went down on July 17. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

1 of 3. A train carrying the remains of the victims of Malaysia Airlines MH17 downed over rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine arrives in the city of Kharkiv in eastern Ukraine July 22, 2014. Almost 300 people were killed when the Malaysia Airlines plane went down on July 17.

Credit: Reuters/Gleb Garanich

DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) – A train carrying the remains of many of the nearly 300 victims of the Malaysia Airlines plane downed over Ukraine arrived in Ukrainian government territory on Tuesday as a separatist leader handed over the plane’s black boxes to Malaysian experts.

The train carrying around 200 body bags arrived in the eastern city of Kharkiv, which is in Ukrainian government hands. The bodies will then be taken back to the Netherlands to be identified.

The train left the crash site after the Malaysian prime minister agreed with the separatists for recovered bodies to be handed over to authorities in the Netherlands, where two thirds of the victims came from.

The handover and reports by international investigators of improved access to the wreckage of the airliner four days after it was shot down, came amid calls for broader sanctions against Russia for its support for the rebellion, although Western leaders are struggling to agree on a response.

Early on Tuesday, senior separatist leader Aleksander Borodai handed over the black boxes in the city of Donetsk.

“Here they are, the black boxes,” Borodai told journalists at the headquarters of his self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic as an armed rebel placed the boxes on a desk.

Colonel Mohamed Sakri of the Malaysian National Security Council said the two black boxes were “in good condition”.

Shaken by the deaths of 298 people from around the world,Western governments have threatened Russia with stifferpenalties for what they say is its backing of pro-Russianmilitia who, their evidence suggests, shot the plane down.

At the United Nations, the Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution demanding those responsible “be held toaccount and that all states cooperate fully with efforts toestablish accountability”.

It also demanded that armed groups allow “safe, secure, fulland unrestricted access” to the crash site.

“We owe it to the victims and their families to determine what happened and who was responsible,” said Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop. Australia lost 28 citizens in the crash.

The Kremlin said on Monday that President Vladimir Putin spoke to Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte by telephone, with both giving a “high assessment of the resolution passed by the U.N. Security Council on the investigation into the catastrophe.”

Meanwhile, European Union foreign ministers were scheduled on Tuesday to discuss further penalties against Russia, but the most they are expected to do is to speed up implementation of sanctions against individuals, and possibly companies, agreed in principle last week before the plane was brought down.

France is under pressure from Washington and London over plans to deliver a second helicopter carrier to Russia.

Diplomats say more serious sanctions against whole sectorsof the Russian economy will depend largely on the line taken bythe Dutch, because of the high number of Dutch victims. “It is clear that Russia must use her influence on theseparatists to improve the situation on the ground,” the Dutch prime minister said.

‘WHAT ARE THEY TRYING TO HIDE?’

U.S. President Barack Obama said it was time for Putin and Russia “to pivot away from the strategy that they’ve been taking and get serious about trying to resolve hostilities within Ukraine.”

He said Putin and Russia had a direct responsibility to compel separatists to cooperate with the investigation, and that the burden was on Moscow to insist that separatists stop tampering with the probe, he said.

“What are they trying to hide?” Obama said at the White House.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott described what was happening at the scene as a cover-up.

“After the crime, comes the cover-up. What we have seen is evidence tampering on an industrial scale and obviously that has to stop,” Abbott told reporters in Canberra on Tuesday.

Russia’s Defence Ministry has challenged Western accusations that pro-Russian separatists were responsible for shooting down the airliner and said Ukrainian warplanes had flown close to it.

The ministry also rejected accusations that Russia had supplied the rebels with SA-11 Buk anti-aircraft missile systems – the weapon said by Kiev and the West to have downed the airliner – “or any other weapons”.

Putin said the downing of the airliner must not be used for political ends and urged separatists to allow international experts access to the crash site.

His ambassador to Malaysia said the rebels did not trust the Ukrainian government and that was why they did not want to hand over the black boxes to them.

“This situation is quite unique, the area is a war zone. I think the international community should be flexible about that and act in a way acceptable to all sides,” Lyudmila Vorobyeva said in a news conference.

The International Air Transport Association said governments should take the lead in reviewing how risk assessments for airspace are made after airlines called for a summit to discuss the downing of the airliner.

RECOVERY EFFORTS

European security monitors said gunmen stopped theminspecting the site when they arrived on Friday, and Ukrainianofficials said separatists had tampered with vital evidence.

But the spokesman for the European security monitors saidthey had unfettered access on Monday, and three members of aDutch disaster victims identification team arrived at a railwaystation near the crash site and inspected the storage of thebodies in refrigerated rail cars.

Peter van Vliet, whose team went through the wagons dressedin surgical masks and rubber gloves, said he was impressed bythe work the recovery crews had done, given the heat and thescale of the crash site. “I think they did a hell of a job in ahell of a place,” he said.

As they went about their work, fighting flared in Donetsk,some 60 km (40 miles) from the site, in a reminder ofthe dangers the experts face operating in a war zone.

Four people were killed in clashes, health officials said.

The rebels’ military commander Igor Strelkov said on hisFacebook page up to 12 of his men died in Monday’s fighting.

(Additional reporting by Pavel Polityuk, Natalia Zinets and Elizabeth Piper in Kiev, Jim Loney, Doina Chiacu, Ayesha Rascoe and Mark Hosenball in Washington, Michelle Nichols at the United Nations, Allison Lampert in Montreal, Lincoln Feast and Matt Siegel in Sydney, Al-Zaquan Amer Hamzah, Anuradha Raghu and Trinna Leong in Kuala Lumpur; William James in London, Julien Ponthus, Elizabeth Pineau and Emmanuel Jarry in Paris, and Gabriela Baczynska in Kiev; Writing by Anna Willard; Editing by Giles Elgood)

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/fugitive-south-korea-ferry-owner-found-dead/
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What’s This?
People watch a TV news showing portraits of Yoo Byung-eun, the fugitive owner of the sunken ferry Sewol, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, July 22, 2014.
Image: AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press
By The Associated Press2014-07-22 08:31:50 UTC
SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean police said Tuesday that a badly decomposed body found surrounded by liquor bottles in a field last month was that of a fugitive billionaire businessman blamed for April’s ferry disaster that killed more than 300 people.
The body was found in a field of apricot trees in the southern city of Suncheon on June 12, local police station chief Wu Hyung-ho told a news conference. He said DNA and fingerprint samples taken from the body matched those of the wanted man, Yoo Byung-eun.

See also: South Korean Ferry Captain and 3 Crew Members Indicted for Homicide

Wu said the body had decayed beyond recognition when it was found and a more thorough examination was needed to find how and when he died. An initial investigation showed there was no evidence that he was murdered, he said.
The dead man was wearing a pair of expensive shoes and a luxurious Italian brand Loro Piana winter parka. Also found near him were three empty Korean liquor bottles, a cloth bag and a magnifying glass, Wu said.
The state-run National Forensic Service took about 40 days to run the DNA tests. Suncheon police officers said the lab will conduct additional tests to find the cause and timing of Yoo’s death.
Police and prosecutors have been seeking Yoo since May and had offered a $500,000 reward for tips about him. They believe Yoo was the owner of the ferry and that his alleged corruption may have contributed to its sinking.
The sinking, one of South Korea’s deadliest disasters in decades, has caused an outpouring of national grief and renewed scrutiny about public safety. About 100 days after the disaster, 294 bodies have been retrieved but 10 people are still missing.
Prosecutors said Monday that 139 people had been arrested over the ferry sinking, including all 15 crew members tasked with navigating the ship, and employees at Chonghaejin, a company that operated the ferry, over suspicions of improper stowage and overloading of cargo. The crew members face charges of negligence and failing to perform their duties to rescue passengers, with four of them facing homicide charges.
Yoo faced allegations of tax evasion, embezzlement and professional negligence. Officials suspect the sinking may have happened because Chonghaejin illicitly funneled profits to his family and failed to spend enough money on safety and personnel.
Yoo, head of the now-defunct predecessor of Chonghaejin, allegedly still controlled the company through a complex web of holding companies in which his children and close associates are large shareholders. The government offered a $100,000 bounty for Yoo’s eldest son, and one of his daughters was arrested in France in May.
The predecessor company went bankrupt in the late 1990s but Yoo’s family continued to operate ferry businesses under the names of other companies, including one that eventually became Chonghaejin.
Yoo is also a member of a church that critics and defectors say is a cult. Yoo’s church made headlines in 1987 when 32 people, who critics suspect were church members, were found dead in the attic of a factory near Seoul in what authorities said was a collective murder-suicide pact. Church members have denied involvement.
Yoo was investigated over the deaths after a probe into the dead people’s financial transactions showed some of their money was funneled to him. He was cleared of suspicions that he was behind the suicides because of a lack of evidence, but was convicted on a separate fraud charge.
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What’s This?

South-korea-ferry-ownerPeople watch a TV news showing portraits of Yoo Byung-eun, the fugitive owner of the sunken ferry Sewol, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, July 22, 2014.

Image: AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press

2014-07-22 08:31:50 UTC

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean police said Tuesday that a badly decomposed body found surrounded by liquor bottles in a field last month was that of a fugitive billionaire businessman blamed for April’s ferry disaster that killed more than 300 people.

The body was found in a field of apricot trees in the southern city of Suncheon on June 12, local police station chief Wu Hyung-ho told a news conference. He said DNA and fingerprint samples taken from the body matched those of the wanted man, Yoo Byung-eun.

Wu said the body had decayed beyond recognition when it was found and a more thorough examination was needed to find how and when he died. An initial investigation showed there was no evidence that he was murdered, he said.

The dead man was wearing a pair of expensive shoes and a luxurious Italian brand Loro Piana winter parka. Also found near him were three empty Korean liquor bottles, a cloth bag and a magnifying glass, Wu said.

The state-run National Forensic Service took about 40 days to run the DNA tests. Suncheon police officers said the lab will conduct additional tests to find the cause and timing of Yoo’s death.

Police and prosecutors have been seeking Yoo since May and had offered a $500,000 reward for tips about him. They believe Yoo was the owner of the ferry and that his alleged corruption may have contributed to its sinking.

The sinking, one of South Korea’s deadliest disasters in decades, has caused an outpouring of national grief and renewed scrutiny about public safety. About 100 days after the disaster, 294 bodies have been retrieved but 10 people are still missing.

Prosecutors said Monday that 139 people had been arrested over the ferry sinking, including all 15 crew members tasked with navigating the ship, and employees at Chonghaejin, a company that operated the ferry, over suspicions of improper stowage and overloading of cargo. The crew members face charges of negligence and failing to perform their duties to rescue passengers, with four of them facing homicide charges.

Yoo faced allegations of tax evasion, embezzlement and professional negligence. Officials suspect the sinking may have happened because Chonghaejin illicitly funneled profits to his family and failed to spend enough money on safety and personnel.

Yoo, head of the now-defunct predecessor of Chonghaejin, allegedly still controlled the company through a complex web of holding companies in which his children and close associates are large shareholders. The government offered a $100,000 bounty for Yoo’s eldest son, and one of his daughters was arrested in France in May.

The predecessor company went bankrupt in the late 1990s but Yoo’s family continued to operate ferry businesses under the names of other companies, including one that eventually became Chonghaejin.

Yoo is also a member of a church that critics and defectors say is a cult. Yoo’s church made headlines in 1987 when 32 people, who critics suspect were church members, were found dead in the attic of a factory near Seoul in what authorities said was a collective murder-suicide pact. Church members have denied involvement.

Yoo was investigated over the deaths after a probe into the dead people’s financial transactions showed some of their money was funneled to him. He was cleared of suspicions that he was behind the suicides because of a lack of evidence, but was convicted on a separate fraud charge.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Topics: US & World, World

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/another-reason-for-defending-net-neutrality-nsa-surveillance/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif
The net neutrality debate has been underway for many years now, but more recently it has entered the mainstream. The main arguments in favor of preserving net neutrality — that it creates a level playing field that allows innovation, and prevents deep-pocketed incumbents from using their financial resources to relegate less well-endowed startups to the Internet slow lane — are familiar enough. But PC World points us to a fascinating paper by Sascha D. Meinrath and Sean Vitka in the journal “Critical Studies in Media Communication” that offers a new and extremely important reason for defending net neutrality: that without it, it will be hard to fight back against blanket surveillance through the wider use of encryption (pdf). Here’s the main argument:

One particularly problematic industry practice is the move by ISPs to create tiered or preferential service offerings. Plans to create tiered services have been floated for years — enabled in part by constant pressure toward less competition in the broadband market. In fact, within mobile broadband services, tiering of various applications (e.g. voice, texting, data) are already normative. But if an ISP can’t tell what sort of application is being used, it doesn’t know whether to prioritize or deprioritize a specific communications stream — which is why good encryption breaks one of the fundamental assumptions for this new business model. Since encryption can help circumvent discriminatory practices, the incentive to use it will expand with practices like tiering.

If net neutrality disappears, and tiering becomes more common, users may turn to encryption to thwart traffic analysis by ISPs. That, in its turn, is likely to lead to ISPs putting encrypted traffic in the slow lane by default — or even trying to ban it altogether. Either would ensure that the majority of users would go back to using communications in the clear, since they would probably be unwilling to pay for their security, which is non-obvious and hard to measure, with the loss of speed — something that is immediately all-too evident.
You might think that it is unlikely that ISPs would be able to push through changes with such serious implications for their customers’ privacy — not least because the usual worthy digital rights organizations would doubtless fight back fiercely. But as Meinrath and Vilka rightly point out, there could be an unholy alliance between industry and security services that would be hard to defeat:

It is difficult to imagine a politician standing up for privacy and free speech rights when opposition of this position, from both well-moneyed private industry and law enforcement, proclaim that encryption supports ‘copyright infringement, child pornography, and terrorism’ — all at once.

That rings horribly true: the copyright industries would doubtless love to get encrypted connections banned, as would the NSA. Bringing together the perfect scaremongering trinity of copyright infringement, child pornography and terrorism could well create a winning combination. The best way to avoid this nightmare scenario is to head it off early. Save net neutrality now, and you save the one thing that we think can help us against surveillance: end-to-end encryption.
Follow me @glynmoody on Twitter or identi.ca, and +glynmoody on Google+
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/another-reason-for-defending-net-neutrality-nsa-surveillance/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

The net neutrality debate has been underway for many years now, but more recently it has entered the mainstream. The main arguments in favor of preserving net neutrality — that it creates a level playing field that allows innovation, and prevents deep-pocketed incumbents from using their financial resources to relegate less well-endowed startups to the Internet slow lane — are familiar enough. But PC World points us to a fascinating paper by Sascha D. Meinrath and Sean Vitka in the journal “Critical Studies in Media Communication” that offers a new and extremely important reason for defending net neutrality: that without it, it will be hard to fight back against blanket surveillance through the wider use of encryption (pdf). Here’s the main argument:

One particularly problematic industry practice is the move by ISPs to create tiered or preferential service offerings. Plans to create tiered services have been floated for years — enabled in part by constant pressure toward less competition in the broadband market. In fact, within mobile broadband services, tiering of various applications (e.g. voice, texting, data) are already normative. But if an ISP can’t tell what sort of application is being used, it doesn’t know whether to prioritize or deprioritize a specific communications stream — which is why good encryption breaks one of the fundamental assumptions for this new business model. Since encryption can help circumvent discriminatory practices, the incentive to use it will expand with practices like tiering.

If net neutrality disappears, and tiering becomes more common, users may turn to encryption to thwart traffic analysis by ISPs. That, in its turn, is likely to lead to ISPs putting encrypted traffic in the slow lane by default — or even trying to ban it altogether. Either would ensure that the majority of users would go back to using communications in the clear, since they would probably be unwilling to pay for their security, which is non-obvious and hard to measure, with the loss of speed — something that is immediately all-too evident.

You might think that it is unlikely that ISPs would be able to push through changes with such serious implications for their customers’ privacy — not least because the usual worthy digital rights organizations would doubtless fight back fiercely. But as Meinrath and Vilka rightly point out, there could be an unholy alliance between industry and security services that would be hard to defeat:

It is difficult to imagine a politician standing up for privacy and free speech rights when opposition of this position, from both well-moneyed private industry and law enforcement, proclaim that encryption supports ‘copyright infringement, child pornography, and terrorism’ — all at once.

That rings horribly true: the copyright industries would doubtless love to get encrypted connections banned, as would the NSA. Bringing together the perfect scaremongering trinity of copyright infringement, child pornography and terrorism could well create a winning combination. The best way to avoid this nightmare scenario is to head it off early. Save net neutrality now, and you save the one thing that we think can help us against surveillance: end-to-end encryption.

Follow me @glynmoody on Twitter or identi.ca, and +glynmoody on Google+

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/cops-wrong-firing-lawsuit-leads-to-public-release-of-vulgarly-titled-enemies-list/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gifAmong the many things Richard Nixon was infamous for, his “Enemies List” stands out for the sheer pettiness involved. The most powerful man in the free world took time out of his schedule to compose a running tab of everyone who had ever slighted him. Without a doubt, the world is full of such pettiness, but most of it remains unexposed, or deployed by people the public could not care less about.
A former campus cop for the University of Oregon (now a court clerk) has sued the school for wrongful termination, something he claims was the result of retaliatory actions by his UOPD (University of Oregon Police Dept.) supervisors. The list of allegations is long and detailed, but much of the friction seems to track back to an (allegedly) oft-discussed “enemies” list maintained by one UOPD officer that (again, allegedly) contained a number of people, ideas and entities that these officers felt should “eat a bowl of dicks.”


The names and terms on the list – which range from politicians to famous personas such as Chelsea Handler and even particular crowds such as “mouth breathers” – were put there when UOPD officers disliked them for one reason or another. In the opinion of the officers, those referred to on the list were entitled to “eat a bowl of dicks,” according to the lawsuit.
[James] Cleavenger is a graduate of UO Law and currently works as a clerk at the Eugene federal court. In his lawsuit, he said that the list was assembled during night shifts and that several officers contributed. The list was kept on Officer Eric LeRoy’s cell phone and, according to the lawsuit, the list was a constant topic and debated over during work hours.

That this sort of behavior occurs is no surprise. In the “us vs. them” environment of law enforcement, it’s almost expected. But it’s rarely admitted to and even more rarely exposed in such a public fashion. Cleavenger alleges that the defendants discussed this list during briefings and many other times during the course of the shift and, most worryingly, that the list contained names of University of Oregon staff and administration.
Rather than the expected denial, the defendants openly admitted (in their filed response to the allegations) the list exists, although they claim it wasn’t discussed quite as frequently as Cleavenger alleges and doesn’t contain the names of people these officers worked for (and in conjunction with).


[…] admit that there were remarks made about a bowl of dicks list but deny such remarks were made during “many” briefings; and admit the referenced list was and is maintained on Leroy’s cell phone. The remaining allegations of paragraph 20 are denied.
In response to paragraph 21, Defendants admit the list identified in paragraph 20 contained dozens of entries; admit O.J. Simpson, Oprah Winfrey and Hilary Clinton were and are on this list; admit Plaintiff alleges he does not have a copy of the list; and admit officers will confirm the existence of the list.

Despite the defendants stating in a legal filing that the list was referred to as the “bowl of dicks” list, a statement from the chief of the UOPD denied the phone-contained list was referred to by that name.

“The list was not meant maliciously, it was not labeled with the vulgarity referred to in the court complaint, and was not a collection of ‘enemies,’” said UO Police Chief Carolyn McDermed.

But it was labeled that way, and the defendants are on record saying so. The allegations in Cleavenger’s complaint note that the list was a “work in progress and constantly updated,” a detail that caught the eye of the UO Matters blog. It issued a public records request for the “bowl of dicks” list and received its own version, albeit one that now contains redactions.

And, note that the court complaint explains that the “eat a bowl …” list was a work in progress that was frequently updated, debated, and discussed. So why does UO only provide one version, and act as if it’s the only one? Here’s UO’s response to my request for “any public records that list the members of the “Bowl of Dicks” list kept by UOPD employee Eric LeRoy.”:
On FridayJul 11, 2014, at 10:22 AM, Office of Public Records  wrote:
“… The attached list is responsive to your request. It is a list of names that was maintained on a UOPD officer’s phone as referenced in a pending litigation.
Thank you for contacting the office with your request.”
Every other public records response from UO includes this boiler-plate:
“The office considers these documents to be fully responsive to your request, and will now close your matter. Thank you for contacting the office with your request.”
Why did they leave it out this time? Because they’ve got more lists?

There are two names redacted in the UO matters version, both of whom are former Oregon football players.

Cliff HarrisAlejandro Maldonado

Apparently, this information wasn’t deemed sensitive enough to redact from the UOPD’s version of the definitely-not-a-”bowl-of-dicks” list. What’s not contained in these documents are Cleavenger’s more serious allegations: that University of Oregon staff were included in the extensive compilation.
What it does look like is a list of annoyances, running from A-, B- and C-list celebrities (Beyonce, Miley Cyrus, Gary Busey) to stuff that generally annoys a large subsection of the public (mouth breathers, fraternities, Comcast, Windows Vista). In fact, for the most part, this is probably one of the least controversial “hate” lists to ever be outed. Osama bin Laden makes the list. So does David Hasselhoff. And Adobe Acrobat.
One of the stranger inclusions is “ORS 352.385,” the state statute that provides for the creation and funding of university police departments. Were these campus cops suffering from a bit of self-hatred? Maybe they didn’t see themselves as “real” cops and felt that they shouldn’t be expected to do much more than hole up in the office and compile a list of eminently hateable entities.
So… tempest in a dickbowl? Possibly, but there are still unanswered questions as to whether the list(s) that have been made public were edited by Officer Eric LeRoy before turning it over to authorities. If these officers were including campus staff on its enemies list, that’s definitely a cause for concern, especially if it prompted any sort of harassment under the color of law.
But at this point, there’s no indication this was much more than a crude inside joke for UOPD officers, albeit one that apparently consumed a great deal of each workday.
The university has gone on the defensive, however, which indicates there may be something to Cleavenger’s allegations.


“A recent story with information about a legal matter involving a former employee of the University of Oregon Police Department focused primarily on the unproven allegations of the former public safety officer and did not provide the university’s responses to the courts or the newspaper reporter,” said the university.

The “blame the press” approach — one that nearly universally goes terribly but is almost always the first reaction to negative attention. But, considering the following was the initial response, what did the university PD expect?

UO Police Chief Carolyn McDermed declined this week to comment on Cleavenger’s firing, saying that the university “does not comment on pending litigation.”

Now, the press is focusing on the fact that the UOPD not only admitted its officers compiled an enemies list, but that it also attached a vulgar name to said list. The official denial by Chief McDermed says otherwise, but one would think that the legal document filed in response to Cleavenger’s allegations is the more trustworthy version. And that version clearly says the list was referred to as the “bowl of dicks” list.
Police officers should know better than anyone else how much evidence a cell phone can store. It’s one thing to be obnoxious behind closed doors during long, boring night shifts. It’s quite another to (allegedly) hassle an officer out of a job because he disagreed with the contents of a vulgarly-named list and the amount of time being spent keeping such a non-essential item updated.
This list doesn’t seem to indicate these officers’ attitude towards the general public was less healthy than any other person’s. In fact, in its own perverse way, it somewhat humanizes these public servants. I mean, who doesn’t hate Vista and Acrobat? But if further versions come to light — ones that show the police were adding staff or students to this obviously negative list — then it’s likely the surface indicator of something uglier lying underneath.


Gov Uscourts Ord 114420 9 0 (PDF)Gov Uscourts Ord 114420 9 0 (Text)
Gov Uscourts Ord 114420 16 0 (PDF)Gov Uscourts Ord 114420 16 0 (Text)
Uopd List (PDF)Uopd List (Text)
UOPD Bowl List 20140709170418887 Redacted (PDF)UOPD Bowl List 20140709170418887 Redacted (Text)
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/cops-wrong-firing-lawsuit-leads-to-public-release-of-vulgarly-titled-enemies-list/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif
Among the many things Richard Nixon was infamous for, his “Enemies List” stands out for the sheer pettiness involved. The most powerful man in the free world took time out of his schedule to compose a running tab of everyone who had ever slighted him. Without a doubt, the world is full of such pettiness, but most of it remains unexposed, or deployed by people the public could not care less about.

A former campus cop for the University of Oregon (now a court clerk) has sued the school for wrongful termination, something he claims was the result of retaliatory actions by his UOPD (University of Oregon Police Dept.) supervisors. The list of allegations is long and detailed, but much of the friction seems to track back to an (allegedly) oft-discussed “enemies” list maintained by one UOPD officer that (again, allegedly) contained a number of people, ideas and entities that these officers felt should “eat a bowl of dicks.”

The names and terms on the list – which range from politicians to famous personas such as Chelsea Handler and even particular crowds such as “mouth breathers” – were put there when UOPD officers disliked them for one reason or another. In the opinion of the officers, those referred to on the list were entitled to “eat a bowl of dicks,” according to the lawsuit.

[James] Cleavenger is a graduate of UO Law and currently works as a clerk at the Eugene federal court. In his lawsuit, he said that the list was assembled during night shifts and that several officers contributed. The list was kept on Officer Eric LeRoy’s cell phone and, according to the lawsuit, the list was a constant topic and debated over during work hours.

That this sort of behavior occurs is no surprise. In the “us vs. them” environment of law enforcement, it’s almost expected. But it’s rarely admitted to and even more rarely exposed in such a public fashion. Cleavenger alleges that the defendants discussed this list during briefings and many other times during the course of the shift and, most worryingly, that the list contained names of University of Oregon staff and administration.

Rather than the expected denial, the defendants openly admitted (in their filed response to the allegations) the list exists, although they claim it wasn’t discussed quite as frequently as Cleavenger alleges and doesn’t contain the names of people these officers worked for (and in conjunction with).

[…] admit that there were remarks made about a bowl of dicks list but deny such remarks were made during “many” briefings; and admit the referenced list was and is maintained on Leroy’s cell phone. The remaining allegations of paragraph 20 are denied.

In response to paragraph 21, Defendants admit the list identified in paragraph 20 contained dozens of entries; admit O.J. Simpson, Oprah Winfrey and Hilary Clinton were and are on this list; admit Plaintiff alleges he does not have a copy of the list; and admit officers will confirm the existence of the list.

Despite the defendants stating in a legal filing that the list was referred to as the “bowl of dicks” list, a statement from the chief of the UOPD denied the phone-contained list was referred to by that name.

“The list was not meant maliciously, it was not labeled with the vulgarity referred to in the court complaint, and was not a collection of ‘enemies,’” said UO Police Chief Carolyn McDermed.

But it was labeled that way, and the defendants are on record saying so. The allegations in Cleavenger’s complaint note that the list was a “work in progress and constantly updated,” a detail that caught the eye of the UO Matters blog. It issued a public records request for the “bowl of dicks” list and received its own version, albeit one that now contains redactions.

And, note that the court complaint explains that the “eat a bowl …” list was a work in progress that was frequently updated, debated, and discussed. So why does UO only provide one version, and act as if it’s the only one? Here’s UO’s response to my request for “any public records that list the members of the “Bowl of Dicks” list kept by UOPD employee Eric LeRoy.”:

On FridayJul 11, 2014, at 10:22 AM, Office of Public Records wrote:

“… The attached list is responsive to your request. It is a list of names that was maintained on a UOPD officer’s phone as referenced in a pending litigation.

Thank you for contacting the office with your request.”

Every other public records response from UO includes this boiler-plate:

“The office considers these documents to be fully responsive to your request, and will now close your matter. Thank you for contacting the office with your request.”

Why did they leave it out this time? Because they’ve got more lists?

There are two names redacted in the UO matters version, both of whom are former Oregon football players.

Cliff Harris
Alejandro Maldonado

Apparently, this information wasn’t deemed sensitive enough to redact from the UOPD’s version of the definitely-not-a-”bowl-of-dicks” list. What’s not contained in these documents are Cleavenger’s more serious allegations: that University of Oregon staff were included in the extensive compilation.

What it does look like is a list of annoyances, running from A-, B- and C-list celebrities (Beyonce, Miley Cyrus, Gary Busey) to stuff that generally annoys a large subsection of the public (mouth breathers, fraternities, Comcast, Windows Vista). In fact, for the most part, this is probably one of the least controversial “hate” lists to ever be outed. Osama bin Laden makes the list. So does David Hasselhoff. And Adobe Acrobat.

One of the stranger inclusions is “ORS 352.385,” the state statute that provides for the creation and funding of university police departments. Were these campus cops suffering from a bit of self-hatred? Maybe they didn’t see themselves as “real” cops and felt that they shouldn’t be expected to do much more than hole up in the office and compile a list of eminently hateable entities.

So… tempest in a dickbowl? Possibly, but there are still unanswered questions as to whether the list(s) that have been made public were edited by Officer Eric LeRoy before turning it over to authorities. If these officers were including campus staff on its enemies list, that’s definitely a cause for concern, especially if it prompted any sort of harassment under the color of law.

But at this point, there’s no indication this was much more than a crude inside joke for UOPD officers, albeit one that apparently consumed a great deal of each workday.

The university has gone on the defensive, however, which indicates there may be something to Cleavenger’s allegations.

“A recent story with information about a legal matter involving a former employee of the University of Oregon Police Department focused primarily on the unproven allegations of the former public safety officer and did not provide the university’s responses to the courts or the newspaper reporter,” said the university.

The “blame the press” approach — one that nearly universally goes terribly but is almost always the first reaction to negative attention. But, considering the following was the initial response, what did the university PD expect?

UO Police Chief Carolyn McDermed declined this week to comment on Cleavenger’s firing, saying that the university “does not comment on pending litigation.”

Now, the press is focusing on the fact that the UOPD not only admitted its officers compiled an enemies list, but that it also attached a vulgar name to said list. The official denial by Chief McDermed says otherwise, but one would think that the legal document filed in response to Cleavenger’s allegations is the more trustworthy version. And that version clearly says the list was referred to as the “bowl of dicks” list.

Police officers should know better than anyone else how much evidence a cell phone can store. It’s one thing to be obnoxious behind closed doors during long, boring night shifts. It’s quite another to (allegedly) hassle an officer out of a job because he disagreed with the contents of a vulgarly-named list and the amount of time being spent keeping such a non-essential item updated.

This list doesn’t seem to indicate these officers’ attitude towards the general public was less healthy than any other person’s. In fact, in its own perverse way, it somewhat humanizes these public servants. I mean, who doesn’t hate Vista and Acrobat? But if further versions come to light — ones that show the police were adding staff or students to this obviously negative list — then it’s likely the surface indicator of something uglier lying underneath.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/hillary-clinton-social-media-shouldnt-be-used-as-a-weapon/
http://rack.0.mshcdn.com/media/ZgkyMDE0LzA3LzIyLzQxL2hpbGxhcnljbGluLmE3NDkzLmpwZwpwCXRodW1iCTk1MHg1MzQjCmUJanBn/e2b6a925/e14/hillary-clinton-2.jpg
What’s This?
Former Secretary of State HIllary Clinton speaks at the BIO International Convention in San Diego on June 25, 2014.
Image: Lenny Ignelzi/Associated Press

By Kurt Wagner2014-07-22 02:26:20 UTC

Hillary Clinton has high hopes for the future of social media — but we’re not there just yet.
The former U.S. Secretary of State spoke at Twitter headquarters in San Francisco Monday night, capping off a day in Silicon Valley during which she also visited Facebook and Google.

See also: 15 Most-Followed Politicians on Twitter

Clinton was interviewed on stage in front of a packed house of Twitter employees, and took time to discuss a variety of subjects, including female empowerment, Russian President Vladimir Putin and the rising costs of higher education.
The former Secretary of State also laid out some lofty expectations for the future of social media, an area she hopes will mature over time. “We have a lot of people communicating, but they’re not listening and they’re not looking for common ground that they could occupy together,” she said. “It is a fact of social media right now that too often people use it as a weapon instead of an opportunity.”
Clinton added that she hopes people will someday use social media for “real conversation” and “reconciliation,” and not just for arguing and bickering over differences.
For her part, Clinton hasn’t been a longtime social-media user. She joined Twitter just over a year ago, and doesn’t have a verified Facebook page besides the one used to promote her new book.
However, Clinton likely understands the importance of social media, particularly when it comes to political campaigns. The 2008 election in which U.S. President Barack Obama edged out Clinton in the Democratic primary is now referred to by some as the “Facebook Election,” a nod to Obama’s strong social-media presence during the race.
Clinton is a probable frontrunner for the Democratic ticket in 2016, although she hasn’t announced her candidacy yet. If she does make a run at the White House, there’s no doubt that social media will be an important part of her campaign strategy.
Clinton also spent time talking about women in leadership roles, particularly in political and technology fields. Representative from Women Who Code, a nonprofit that aims to inspire women to pursue tech careers, also received a shoutout from Clinton at the beginning of her Q&A.
“Having women leaders sends a message to half the population of the world that they are truly included, and that their full participation is not only expected, but wanted,” she said.
Katie Stanton, Twitter’s vice-president of global media, moderated the discussion, and asked questions from well-known female Twitter users, including philanthropist Melinda Gates, actors Kerry Washington and Amy Poehler, and retired U.S. soccer star Julie Foudy.
Clinton also participated in a Facebook Q&A on Monday, which took place on the Facebook Page for her book. Read that conversation, here, and watch her on-stage conversation at Twitter, below:
Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.
 Topics: dick costolo, Hillary Clinton, Politics, Social Media, Twitter, twitter headquarters, U.S.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/hillary-clinton-social-media-shouldnt-be-used-as-a-weapon/
http://rack.0.mshcdn.com/media/ZgkyMDE0LzA3LzIyLzQxL2hpbGxhcnljbGluLmE3NDkzLmpwZwpwCXRodW1iCTk1MHg1MzQjCmUJanBn/e2b6a925/e14/hillary-clinton-2.jpg

What’s This?

Hillary-clinton-2Former Secretary of State HIllary Clinton speaks at the BIO International Convention in San Diego on June 25, 2014.

Image: Lenny Ignelzi/Associated Press

Hillary Clinton has high hopes for the future of social media — but we’re not there just yet.

The former U.S. Secretary of State spoke at Twitter headquarters in San Francisco Monday night, capping off a day in Silicon Valley during which she also visited Facebook and Google.

Clinton was interviewed on stage in front of a packed house of Twitter employees, and took time to discuss a variety of subjects, including female empowerment, Russian President Vladimir Putin and the rising costs of higher education.

The former Secretary of State also laid out some lofty expectations for the future of social media, an area she hopes will mature over time. “We have a lot of people communicating, but they’re not listening and they’re not looking for common ground that they could occupy together,” she said. “It is a fact of social media right now that too often people use it as a weapon instead of an opportunity.”

Clinton added that she hopes people will someday use social media for “real conversation” and “reconciliation,” and not just for arguing and bickering over differences.

For her part, Clinton hasn’t been a longtime social-media user. She joined Twitter just over a year ago, and doesn’t have a verified Facebook page besides the one used to promote her new book.

However, Clinton likely understands the importance of social media, particularly when it comes to political campaigns. The 2008 election in which U.S. President Barack Obama edged out Clinton in the Democratic primary is now referred to by some as the “Facebook Election,” a nod to Obama’s strong social-media presence during the race.

Clinton is a probable frontrunner for the Democratic ticket in 2016, although she hasn’t announced her candidacy yet. If she does make a run at the White House, there’s no doubt that social media will be an important part of her campaign strategy.

Clinton also spent time talking about women in leadership roles, particularly in political and technology fields. Representative from Women Who Code, a nonprofit that aims to inspire women to pursue tech careers, also received a shoutout from Clinton at the beginning of her Q&A.

“Having women leaders sends a message to half the population of the world that they are truly included, and that their full participation is not only expected, but wanted,” she said.

Katie Stanton, Twitter’s vice-president of global media, moderated the discussion, and asked questions from well-known female Twitter users, including philanthropist Melinda Gates, actors Kerry Washington and Amy Poehler, and retired U.S. soccer star Julie Foudy.

Clinton also participated in a Facebook Q&A on Monday, which took place on the Facebook Page for her book. Read that conversation, here, and watch her on-stage conversation at Twitter, below:

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Topics: dick costolo, Hillary Clinton, Politics, Social Media, Twitter, twitter headquarters, U.S.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/a-microsoft-surface-revenue-bet/
http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/screen-shot-2014-07-21-at-4-56-14-pm.png?w=738After the introduction of the Surface Pro 3, I tweeted that I thought it would do pretty well in the market. I should have clarified that I meant that in the context of prior Surface sales, but I can’t edit tweets after the fact, so here we are.
Valleywag’s Sam Biddle didn’t agree, and so we made a friendly wager on the matter.
Microsoft reports its earnings tomorrow, and will provide a fresh Surface revenue number as part of that release. I’ve confirmed with the company that the specific Surface figure will be broken out, as per usual.
It seems, however, that I somewhat borked myself in the bet. As it turns out, the $500 million figure was rounded. Surface revenue in the last quarter was actually $494 million (this is why you should never 8-K when you can 10-Q). So I skewed the threshold north by depending on a rounded statistic.
Even more, I presumed that all pre-ordered Surface Pro 3s would see their revenue tallied in the fiscal period. Not so. Only revenue from Surface Pro 3s running Intel Core i5 chips will be counted, as systems running i3 and i7 chips shipped after the end of the quarter, and thus their top line will land in Microsoft’s fiscal first quarter (the current calendar quarter). So a large chunk of revenue that I thought existed the quarter we bet on doesn’t. Oops.
So if I could take out a re-bet, I’d lower my Surface revenue forecasts by 25 to 30 percent. Though, when I’m wrong, I like to do it at full speed.
Please accept this post as an oblation for being quite probably overly optimistic.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/a-microsoft-surface-revenue-bet/
http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/screen-shot-2014-07-21-at-4-56-14-pm.png?w=738

After the introduction of the Surface Pro 3, I tweeted that I thought it would do pretty well in the market. I should have clarified that I meant that in the context of prior Surface sales, but I can’t edit tweets after the fact, so here we are.

Valleywag’s Sam Biddle didn’t agree, and so we made a friendly wager on the matter.

Microsoft reports its earnings tomorrow, and will provide a fresh Surface revenue number as part of that release. I’ve confirmed with the company that the specific Surface figure will be broken out, as per usual.

It seems, however, that I somewhat borked myself in the bet. As it turns out, the $500 million figure was rounded. Surface revenue in the last quarter was actually $494 million (this is why you should never 8-K when you can 10-Q). So I skewed the threshold north by depending on a rounded statistic.

Even more, I presumed that all pre-ordered Surface Pro 3s would see their revenue tallied in the fiscal period. Not so. Only revenue from Surface Pro 3s running Intel Core i5 chips will be counted, as systems running i3 and i7 chips shipped after the end of the quarter, and thus their top line will land in Microsoft’s fiscal first quarter (the current calendar quarter). So a large chunk of revenue that I thought existed the quarter we bet on doesn’t. Oops.

So if I could take out a re-bet, I’d lower my Surface revenue forecasts by 25 to 30 percent. Though, when I’m wrong, I like to do it at full speed.

Please accept this post as an oblation for being quite probably overly optimistic.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/bodies-black-boxes-handed-over-from-ukraine-crash-site/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

By Anton Zverev and Peter Graff
DONETSK Ukraine Mon Jul 21, 2014 3:00pm IST



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By Anton Zverev and Peter Graff DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) – Ukrainian army tanks were reported to be launching an assault to break pro-Russian rebels’ hold on the eastern city of Donetsk on Monday in the first major outbreak of hostilities in the…
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DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) – Ukrainian army tanks were reported to be launching an assault to break pro-Russian rebels’ hold on the eastern city of Donetsk on Monday in the first major outbreak of hostilities in the area since Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down last week.

A separatist leader said Ukrainian government forces were trying to break into Donetsk and fighting was under way near the railway station.

Sergei Kavtaradze, of the rebels’ self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic, said at least four tanks and armoured vehicles were trying to break through into the city.

A Ukrainian military spokesman said the operation was in progress but would not comment on reports of troops entering Donetsk. “The active phase of the anti-terrorist operation is continuing. We are not about to announce any troop movements,” Vladyslav Seleznyov said.

Reuters journalists also saw two rebel tanks heading towards Donetsk railway station.

As international horror deepened over the fate of the remains of the 298 victims of the air disaster, the first international investigators reached rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine on Monday.

Three members of a Dutch disaster victims identification team arrived in Donetsk and were expected to visit a railway station near the crash site where nearly 200 bodies have been stored in refrigerated wagons.

Rescuers said they had found a total of 251 bodies and 86 body fragments at the crash site and a second refrigerated train had arrived.

The shooting down of the airliner on Thursday has sharply deepened the Ukrainian crisis, in which separatists in the Russian-speaking east have been fighting government forces since protesters in Kiev forced out a pro-Moscow president and Russia annexed Crimea in March.

The United States and its allies have pointed the finger at the pro-Russian rebels and at Moscow itself over the downing of the plane although Russia has denied involvement.

SHOCK TURNS TO ANGER

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry laid out what he called overwhelming evidence of Russian complicity in the shooting down of the Malaysia Airlines plane.

Kerry demanded that Moscow take responsibility for actions of pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine whom Washington suspects of downing the jet with a missile, and expressed disgust at their “grotesque” mishandling of the bodies.

Television images of the rebel-controlled crash sites, where the remains of victims had lain decomposing in fields among their personal belongings, have turned initial shock and sorrow after Thursday’s disaster into anger.

Emotions ran high in the Netherlands, the home country of about two thirds of the 298 people who died in the Boeing 777. The Dutch foreign minister has said the nation is “furious” to hear bodies were being “dragged around”, while relatives and church leaders demanded they be rapidly returned home.

But the departure of dozens of corpses loaded into the refrigerated railway wagons was delayed on Sunday as Ukrainian officials and rebels traded blame over why the train had not yet left the war zone, and where or when international investigators would be able to check it. (Full Story)

The U.N. Security Council is scheduled to vote on Monday on a resolution that would condemn the downing of the plane, and demands that those responsible be held accountable and that armed groups not compromise the integrity of the crash site.

In an apparent attempt at compromise with Moscow, the wording of the resolution, drafted by Australia, was changed to characterise the incident as the “downing” of the flight, instead of “shooting down”, according to the final draft obtained by Reuters. Diplomats said it was unclear if Russia would support the final version.

In Washington, Kerry criticised Russian President Vladimir Putin and threatened “additional steps” against Moscow.

“Drunken separatists have been piling bodies into trucks and removing them from the site,” he said on NBC television on Sunday. “What’s happening is really grotesque and it is contrary to everything President Putin and Russia said they would do.”

Russia has blamed the Ukrainian military for the disaster. But while stopping short of directly blaming Moscow, Kerry put forward the most detailed U.S. accusations so far, based on the latest U.S. intelligence assessments.

British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond urged Moscow to ensure international investigators had access to the crash sites. “Russia risks becoming a pariah state if it does not behave properly,” he told Sky television.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said he had spoken to Putin for the first time about the disaster. At least 27 Australian passengers were on the flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur.

Abbott said an Australian investigation team was in Kiev but had been unable to travel to the site. He said there had been some improvement with the Ukrainian government offering access.

“But there’s still a hell of a long way to go before anyone could be satisfied with the way that site is being treated,” Abbott said. “It’s more like a garden cleanup than a forensic investigation. This is completely unacceptable.”

After lying for two days in the summer heat, the bodies had been removed from much of the crash site by Sunday, leaving only bloodstained military stretchers along the side of the road.

As Ukraine accused the rebels of hiding evidence relating to the loss of the airliner, a separatist leader said items thought to be the stricken jet’s “black boxes” were now in rebel hands.

Investigators from the U.N. aviation agency arrived in Ukraine to help to investigate the crash, but a senior official said safety concerns prevented them from reaching the crash site.

U.S. CASE

Kerry said the United States had seen supplies moving into Ukraine from Russia in the last month, including a 150-vehicle convoy of armoured personnel carriers, tanks and rocket launchers given to the separatists.

It had also intercepted conversations about the transfer to separatists of the Russian radar-guided SA-11 missile system, which it blames for the Boeing 777′s destruction. “It’s pretty clear that this is a system that was transferred from Russia,” Kerry said in an interview on CNN.

Kerry’s evidence of a Russian connection tracked closely an official unclassified U.S. intelligence summary released over the weekend. It said intelligence analysts confirmed the authenticity of an audiotape conversation provided to the media by Ukrainian authorities of a known separatist leader boasting of downing the plane.

“We also have information indicating that Russia is providing training to separatist fighters at a facility in southwest Russia” that includes missile systems, it said.

The United States has already imposed sanctions on individuals and businesses close to Putin but Kerry indicated that President Barack Obama might go further. “The president is prepared to take additional steps,” he told Fox News, although he ruled out sending in U.S. troops.

European Union ministers should be ready to announce a fresh round of sanctions at a meeting of the EU’s Foreign Affairs Council this week, said a statement from British Prime Minister David Cameron’s office, issued after telephone calls with French President Francois Hollander and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

(Additional reporting by Peter Graff in Hrabove, Pavel Polityuk, Natalia Zinets and Elizabeth Piper in Kiev, Jim Loney, Doina Chiacu, Ayesha Rascoe and Mark Hosenball in Washington, Michelle Nichols at the United Nations, Allison Lampert in Montreal, Lincoln Feast and Jane Wardell in Sydney, William James in London and Nicholas Vinocur in Paris; Writing by Giles Elgood and David Stamp; Editing by Tom Heneghan, Peter Cooney and Eric Walsh)


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http://blog.seaofinfo.com/bodies-black-boxes-handed-over-from-ukraine-crash-site/
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DONETSK Ukraine Mon Jul 21, 2014 3:00pm IST

DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) – Ukrainian army tanks were reported to be launching an assault to break pro-Russian rebels’ hold on the eastern city of Donetsk on Monday in the first major outbreak of hostilities in the area since Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down last week.

A separatist leader said Ukrainian government forces were trying to break into Donetsk and fighting was under way near the railway station.

Sergei Kavtaradze, of the rebels’ self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic, said at least four tanks and armoured vehicles were trying to break through into the city.

A Ukrainian military spokesman said the operation was in progress but would not comment on reports of troops entering Donetsk. “The active phase of the anti-terrorist operation is continuing. We are not about to announce any troop movements,” Vladyslav Seleznyov said.

Reuters journalists also saw two rebel tanks heading towards Donetsk railway station.

As international horror deepened over the fate of the remains of the 298 victims of the air disaster, the first international investigators reached rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine on Monday.

Three members of a Dutch disaster victims identification team arrived in Donetsk and were expected to visit a railway station near the crash site where nearly 200 bodies have been stored in refrigerated wagons.

Rescuers said they had found a total of 251 bodies and 86 body fragments at the crash site and a second refrigerated train had arrived.

The shooting down of the airliner on Thursday has sharply deepened the Ukrainian crisis, in which separatists in the Russian-speaking east have been fighting government forces since protesters in Kiev forced out a pro-Moscow president and Russia annexed Crimea in March.

The United States and its allies have pointed the finger at the pro-Russian rebels and at Moscow itself over the downing of the plane although Russia has denied involvement.

SHOCK TURNS TO ANGER

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry laid out what he called overwhelming evidence of Russian complicity in the shooting down of the Malaysia Airlines plane.

Kerry demanded that Moscow take responsibility for actions of pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine whom Washington suspects of downing the jet with a missile, and expressed disgust at their “grotesque” mishandling of the bodies.

Television images of the rebel-controlled crash sites, where the remains of victims had lain decomposing in fields among their personal belongings, have turned initial shock and sorrow after Thursday’s disaster into anger.

Emotions ran high in the Netherlands, the home country of about two thirds of the 298 people who died in the Boeing 777. The Dutch foreign minister has said the nation is “furious” to hear bodies were being “dragged around”, while relatives and church leaders demanded they be rapidly returned home.

But the departure of dozens of corpses loaded into the refrigerated railway wagons was delayed on Sunday as Ukrainian officials and rebels traded blame over why the train had not yet left the war zone, and where or when international investigators would be able to check it. (Full Story)

The U.N. Security Council is scheduled to vote on Monday on a resolution that would condemn the downing of the plane, and demands that those responsible be held accountable and that armed groups not compromise the integrity of the crash site.

In an apparent attempt at compromise with Moscow, the wording of the resolution, drafted by Australia, was changed to characterise the incident as the “downing” of the flight, instead of “shooting down”, according to the final draft obtained by Reuters. Diplomats said it was unclear if Russia would support the final version.

In Washington, Kerry criticised Russian President Vladimir Putin and threatened “additional steps” against Moscow.

“Drunken separatists have been piling bodies into trucks and removing them from the site,” he said on NBC television on Sunday. “What’s happening is really grotesque and it is contrary to everything President Putin and Russia said they would do.”

Russia has blamed the Ukrainian military for the disaster. But while stopping short of directly blaming Moscow, Kerry put forward the most detailed U.S. accusations so far, based on the latest U.S. intelligence assessments.

British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond urged Moscow to ensure international investigators had access to the crash sites. “Russia risks becoming a pariah state if it does not behave properly,” he told Sky television.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said he had spoken to Putin for the first time about the disaster. At least 27 Australian passengers were on the flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur.

Abbott said an Australian investigation team was in Kiev but had been unable to travel to the site. He said there had been some improvement with the Ukrainian government offering access.

“But there’s still a hell of a long way to go before anyone could be satisfied with the way that site is being treated,” Abbott said. “It’s more like a garden cleanup than a forensic investigation. This is completely unacceptable.”

After lying for two days in the summer heat, the bodies had been removed from much of the crash site by Sunday, leaving only bloodstained military stretchers along the side of the road.

As Ukraine accused the rebels of hiding evidence relating to the loss of the airliner, a separatist leader said items thought to be the stricken jet’s “black boxes” were now in rebel hands.

Investigators from the U.N. aviation agency arrived in Ukraine to help to investigate the crash, but a senior official said safety concerns prevented them from reaching the crash site.

U.S. CASE

Kerry said the United States had seen supplies moving into Ukraine from Russia in the last month, including a 150-vehicle convoy of armoured personnel carriers, tanks and rocket launchers given to the separatists.

It had also intercepted conversations about the transfer to separatists of the Russian radar-guided SA-11 missile system, which it blames for the Boeing 777′s destruction. “It’s pretty clear that this is a system that was transferred from Russia,” Kerry said in an interview on CNN.

Kerry’s evidence of a Russian connection tracked closely an official unclassified U.S. intelligence summary released over the weekend. It said intelligence analysts confirmed the authenticity of an audiotape conversation provided to the media by Ukrainian authorities of a known separatist leader boasting of downing the plane.

“We also have information indicating that Russia is providing training to separatist fighters at a facility in southwest Russia” that includes missile systems, it said.

The United States has already imposed sanctions on individuals and businesses close to Putin but Kerry indicated that President Barack Obama might go further. “The president is prepared to take additional steps,” he told Fox News, although he ruled out sending in U.S. troops.

European Union ministers should be ready to announce a fresh round of sanctions at a meeting of the EU’s Foreign Affairs Council this week, said a statement from British Prime Minister David Cameron’s office, issued after telephone calls with French President Francois Hollander and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

(Additional reporting by Peter Graff in Hrabove, Pavel Polityuk, Natalia Zinets and Elizabeth Piper in Kiev, Jim Loney, Doina Chiacu, Ayesha Rascoe and Mark Hosenball in Washington, Michelle Nichols at the United Nations, Allison Lampert in Montreal, Lincoln Feast and Jane Wardell in Sydney, William James in London and Nicholas Vinocur in Paris; Writing by Giles Elgood and David Stamp; Editing by Tom Heneghan, Peter Cooney and Eric Walsh)

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/a-radio-station-called-dairy-queen-in-salem-ore-to-see-if-it-knew-baylor-qb-bryce-petty/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif
Do you know who Bryce Petty is?
According to Baylor coach Art Briles, Petty, Baylor’s starting quarterback, should be a household name. “Go to a Dairy Queen in Salem, Ore…” and they’ll know Petty, Briles said.
So, John Canzano from oregonlive.com did just that and the results were fantastic.

At least one of my radio-show (750-AM and 102.7-FM, 12-3p) production assistants (went to a Dairy Queen in Salem, Ore). There are six official Dairy Queen locations in Salem. Judah Newby made the calls, so full credit to him, but the audio is priceless.


None of the six locations had heard of Petty.


“I’ve never heard of him,” said one male (West Salem) Dairy Queen employee, who was asked if he knew Petty or Briles. “You know you called a fast food restaurant, right? Are those like owners of Dairy Queens or employees?”


Another male Dairy Queen employee at the Mission Street location said, “I’m not familiar with it at all, I can ask my manager.”


The manager said, “I have no idea. I don’t know.”


The best employee reaction when asked if anyone knew Bryce Petty.


“Like a dog?”

Credit to Canzano, this was pretty genius and hilarious.
“Like a dog?” What does that even mean?
Even if the fine folks at the Dairy Queen’s in Salem, Ore., don’t know Petty, college football fans should know him and he will probably be one of the players generating Heisman hype to start the season.
Last year, Petty completed 62 percent of his passes for 4,200 yards, 32 touchdowns and just three interceptions. But Briles said he was upset that despite his amazing numbers, Petty was seventh on the Heisman ballot and only six get invited to the Heisman ceremony.
“His perception, his image is different from a year ago because he had nothing. Now he’s got substance, he’s got something people can believe,” Briles said. “What he can bring this year is an attitude of when I talk, people are going to listen a little bit. Like I tell the players you want to be listened to, produce. He’s produced. He’s got a chance to be heard. When he speaks, now people listen.
“As far as what he can do this year just win football games, win games with his national name, everything will take care of itself.”
- – - – - – -
Graham Watson is the editor of Dr. Saturday on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email her at dr.saturday@ymail.com or follow her on Twitter!
American Football
Sports & Recreation
Dairy Queen
Bryce Petty
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/a-radio-station-called-dairy-queen-in-salem-ore-to-see-if-it-knew-baylor-qb-bryce-petty/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

Do you know who Bryce Petty is?

According to Baylor coach Art Briles, Petty, Baylor’s starting quarterback, should be a household name. “Go to a Dairy Queen in Salem, Ore…” and they’ll know Petty, Briles said.

So, John Canzano from oregonlive.com did just that and the results were fantastic.

At least one of my radio-show (750-AM and 102.7-FM, 12-3p) production assistants (went to a Dairy Queen in Salem, Ore). There are six official Dairy Queen locations in Salem. Judah Newby made the calls, so full credit to him, but the audio is priceless.

None of the six locations had heard of Petty.

“I’ve never heard of him,” said one male (West Salem) Dairy Queen employee, who was asked if he knew Petty or Briles. “You know you called a fast food restaurant, right? Are those like owners of Dairy Queens or employees?”

Another male Dairy Queen employee at the Mission Street location said, “I’m not familiar with it at all, I can ask my manager.”

The manager said, “I have no idea. I don’t know.”

The best employee reaction when asked if anyone knew Bryce Petty.

“Like a dog?”

Credit to Canzano, this was pretty genius and hilarious.

“Like a dog?” What does that even mean?

Even if the fine folks at the Dairy Queen’s in Salem, Ore., don’t know Petty, college football fans should know him and he will probably be one of the players generating Heisman hype to start the season.

Last year, Petty completed 62 percent of his passes for 4,200 yards, 32 touchdowns and just three interceptions. But Briles said he was upset that despite his amazing numbers, Petty was seventh on the Heisman ballot and only six get invited to the Heisman ceremony.

“His perception, his image is different from a year ago because he had nothing. Now he’s got substance, he’s got something people can believe,” Briles said. “What he can bring this year is an attitude of when I talk, people are going to listen a little bit. Like I tell the players you want to be listened to, produce. He’s produced. He’s got a chance to be heard. When he speaks, now people listen.

“As far as what he can do this year just win football games, win games with his national name, everything will take care of itself.”

- – - – - – -

Graham Watson is the editor of Dr. Saturday on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email her at dr.saturday@ymail.com or follow her on Twitter!

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/facebook-adds-a-read-it-later-button/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/07/introducingsaved2/lead.png?n931axThe company lets users save news stories. Will it threaten competitors Instapaper and Pocket?

Facebook

About a year ago, Facebook made a big change to its News Feed, the central stream users see when they open the service’s homepage or smartphone app. Into the algorithmic mix of statuses and pictures normally there, the social giant began to toss many, many more news stories from around the web.
The change turned users into readers—or, at least, skimmers—and provided a traffic boon to online publishers. Since then, Facebook has continued to hone that feature, reducing the prevalence (for example) of especially click-baity content that some users find annoying.
Now, the company has introduced an even more reader-friendly feature: It’s giving users a way to slow down the stream.
Facebook today introduced a new “Save” feature to its homepage and smartphone apps. When someone see a link to a news story in their feed that they want to read, but which they don’t have time for at the moment, they’ll be able to click “Save for Later” and add the story to a list to read later.
The feature mirrors popular apps like Instapaper and Pocket, though it doesn’t let users save stories for offline reading as those do. Unlike those apps, too, it has access to users’s Facebook News Feeds—which means it can re-advertise the stories in their feed later on as “Links You Saved.”
 Facebook
And “Save” makes sense. Facebook believes its future is app-ified: Unlike the singular, monolithic Facebook of yore, the company thinks users will soon interact with its core service through many smaller routes. They won’t use Facebook’s photo-sharing service; they’ll use Instagram. That philosophy underlies both Facebook’s ginormous purchase of messaging software WhatsApp and its development of struggling Snapchat competitor, Slingshot.
Another way to app-ify your future is to, well, borrow features of popular apps and fold them into your main product. That’s just what “Save” is—it borrows from Instapaper and Pocket—and, while it can seem like the big bad blue is stealing products from smaller competitors, these large-scale borrowings can supposedly help stimulate sales of the borrowed-from.
That is, Facebook isn’t the first company to mimic Instapaper or Pocket. In 2011, Apple released “Reading List” on to the desktop and iOS version of its web browser. Like “Save,” it let users save a webpage to be read later. Yet upon its release, Instapaper developer Marco Arment was sanguine:

My biggest challenge isn’t winning over converts from my competitors: it’s explaining what Instapaper does and convincing people that they actually need it. Once they “get it”, they love it, but explaining its value in one quick, easy-to-understand, general-audience sentence is more difficult than you might imagine.
If Apple gets a bunch of Safari users — the browser that works best with Instapaper — to get into a “read later” workflow and see the value in such features, those users are prime potential Instapaper customers. And it gives me an easier way to explain it to them: “It’s like Safari’s Reading List, but better, in these ways.”

Substitute “Facebook” for “Apple” and “Safari,” and you have today’s situation. And though it’s natural for any business leader to play it cool in the face of competition, Instapaper and Pocket do have core features Save doesn’t. It’ll be interesting to see whether, at its largest scale yet, Arment’s predicted effect comes true.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/facebook-adds-a-read-it-later-button/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/07/introducingsaved2/lead.png?n931ax

The company lets users save news stories. Will it threaten competitors Instapaper and Pocket?

Facebook

About a year ago, Facebook made a big change to its News Feed, the central stream users see when they open the service’s homepage or smartphone app. Into the algorithmic mix of statuses and pictures normally there, the social giant began to toss many, many more news stories from around the web.

The change turned users into readers—or, at least, skimmers—and provided a traffic boon to online publishers. Since then, Facebook has continued to hone that feature, reducing the prevalence (for example) of especially click-baity content that some users find annoying.

Now, the company has introduced an even more reader-friendly feature: It’s giving users a way to slow down the stream.

Facebook today introduced a new “Save” feature to its homepage and smartphone apps. When someone see a link to a news story in their feed that they want to read, but which they don’t have time for at the moment, they’ll be able to click “Save for Later” and add the story to a list to read later.

The feature mirrors popular apps like Instapaper and Pocket, though it doesn’t let users save stories for offline reading as those do. Unlike those apps, too, it has access to users’s Facebook News Feeds—which means it can re-advertise the stories in their feed later on as “Links You Saved.”

Facebook

And “Save” makes sense. Facebook believes its future is app-ified: Unlike the singular, monolithic Facebook of yore, the company thinks users will soon interact with its core service through many smaller routes. They won’t use Facebook’s photo-sharing service; they’ll use Instagram. That philosophy underlies both Facebook’s ginormous purchase of messaging software WhatsApp and its development of struggling Snapchat competitor, Slingshot.

Another way to app-ify your future is to, well, borrow features of popular apps and fold them into your main product. That’s just what “Save” is—it borrows from Instapaper and Pocket—and, while it can seem like the big bad blue is stealing products from smaller competitors, these large-scale borrowings can supposedly help stimulate sales of the borrowed-from.

That is, Facebook isn’t the first company to mimic Instapaper or Pocket. In 2011, Apple released “Reading List” on to the desktop and iOS version of its web browser. Like “Save,” it let users save a webpage to be read later. Yet upon its release, Instapaper developer Marco Arment was sanguine:

My biggest challenge isn’t winning over converts from my competitors: it’s explaining what Instapaper does and convincing people that they actually need it. Once they “get it”, they love it, but explaining its value in one quick, easy-to-understand, general-audience sentence is more difficult than you might imagine.

If Apple gets a bunch of Safari users — the browser that works best with Instapaper — to get into a “read later” workflow and see the value in such features, those users are prime potential Instapaper customers. And it gives me an easier way to explain it to them: “It’s like Safari’s Reading List, but better, in these ways.”

Substitute “Facebook” for “Apple” and “Safari,” and you have today’s situation. And though it’s natural for any business leader to play it cool in the face of competition, Instapaper and Pocket do have core features Save doesn’t. It’ll be interesting to see whether, at its largest scale yet, Arment’s predicted effect comes true.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/shania-twains-vegas-residency-to-end-in-december/
http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/JKFaiDWF9SSlPNkQWCVNWg—/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTQyMTtweG9mZj01MDtweW9mZj0wO3E9NzU7dz03NDk-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/14e78e59761e8b1c5a0f6a7067002386.jpg

FILE – This Dec. 1, 2012 file photo shows Shania Twain performing at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Twain says she’ll end her residency in Las Vegas with a final show Dec. 13, 2014, two years after she began performing at Caesars Palace. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP, File)
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/shania-twains-vegas-residency-to-end-in-december/
http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/JKFaiDWF9SSlPNkQWCVNWg—/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTQyMTtweG9mZj01MDtweW9mZj0wO3E9NzU7dz03NDk-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/14e78e59761e8b1c5a0f6a7067002386.jpg
FILE - This Dec. 1, 2012 file photo shows Shania Twain performing at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Twain says she'll end her residency in Las Vegas with a final show Dec. 13, 2014, two years after she began performing at Caesars Palace. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP, File)

FILE – This Dec. 1, 2012 file photo shows Shania Twain performing at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Twain says she’ll end her residency in Las Vegas with a final show Dec. 13, 2014, two years after she began performing at Caesars Palace. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP, File)

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/shania-twains-vegas-residency-to-end-in-december-2/
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FILE – This Dec. 1, 2012 file photo shows Shania Twain performing at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Twain says she’ll end her residency in Las Vegas with a final show Dec. 13, 2014, two years after she began performing at Caesars Palace. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP, File)
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/shania-twains-vegas-residency-to-end-in-december-2/
http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/JKFaiDWF9SSlPNkQWCVNWg—/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTQyMTtweG9mZj01MDtweW9mZj0wO3E9NzU7dz03NDk-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/14e78e59761e8b1c5a0f6a7067002386.jpg
FILE - This Dec. 1, 2012 file photo shows Shania Twain performing at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Twain says she'll end her residency in Las Vegas with a final show Dec. 13, 2014, two years after she began performing at Caesars Palace. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP, File)

FILE – This Dec. 1, 2012 file photo shows Shania Twain performing at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Twain says she’ll end her residency in Las Vegas with a final show Dec. 13, 2014, two years after she began performing at Caesars Palace. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP, File)

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/32-irresistible-pieces-of-musical-junk-food/
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What’s This?
Indulge your musical sweet tooth.
Image: Flickr, William Hook

By Connor Finnegan2014-07-21 21:20:09 UTC

Your musical diet starts tomorrow.
Monday is National Junk Food Day, a holiday that gives us a free pass to indulge our cravings for greasy burgers and sugary candy. While it’s best to make a habit of consuming healthier meals on a regular basis, it still feels good to treat yourself once in a while.

See also: 8 Wines to Pair With Your Fast Food

The same thinking goes for music. While we can all benefit from the enriching tunes of instrumental virtuosos and show-stopping vocalists, sometimes we just need those catchy-but-awful top-40 hits to power through the day.
That’s why we assembled this Music Monday playlist full of all your guilty pleasures. So throw on these irresistibly catchy tunes, sing your heart out and enjoy your musical “cheat day.”
Have something to add to our playlist? Share with us in the comments, below, or on Spotify, and we’ll add it.
How to Share Your Song With Us
1. To follow Mashable on Spotify, click here. If a popup window asks you to launch an external application, accept. This just means the browser will open up Spotify.
2. Follow Mashable, or send us music by clicking “Send Music.”
3. To send music while browsing tracks within Spotify, follow the MashableHQ account. Then right-click (ctrl + click) on the song you want to send, and click the “Share” option.
4. By default, Spotify pulls up the “Post to Feed” option. Instead, select the “Send to Friend” tab, type in “MashableHQ” and hit the blue “Send” button.
If “MashableHQ” doesn’t show up when you’re trying to send a track, make sure you’re following the account. If you’re still having problems sending a song after that, let us know in the comments, below, and we’ll help you fix the problem.
Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.
Topics: Entertainment, fast food, Music, Music Monday, playlist, spotify
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/32-irresistible-pieces-of-musical-junk-food/
http://rack.3.mshcdn.com/media/ZgkyMDE0LzA3LzIxLzQ1LzI3ODQ1Njg2ODAuZTEzNTYuanBnCnAJdGh1bWIJOTUweDUzNCMKZQlqcGc/a239a5be/91b/2784568680_a6c4b10a6b_b.jpg

What’s This?

2784568680_a6c4b10a6b_bIndulge your musical sweet tooth.

Image: Flickr, William Hook

Your musical diet starts tomorrow.

Monday is National Junk Food Day, a holiday that gives us a free pass to indulge our cravings for greasy burgers and sugary candy. While it’s best to make a habit of consuming healthier meals on a regular basis, it still feels good to treat yourself once in a while.

The same thinking goes for music. While we can all benefit from the enriching tunes of instrumental virtuosos and show-stopping vocalists, sometimes we just need those catchy-but-awful top-40 hits to power through the day.

That’s why we assembled this Music Monday playlist full of all your guilty pleasures. So throw on these irresistibly catchy tunes, sing your heart out and enjoy your musical “cheat day.”

Have something to add to our playlist? Share with us in the comments, below, or on Spotify, and we’ll add it.

How to Share Your Song With Us

1. To follow Mashable on Spotify, click here. If a popup window asks you to launch an external application, accept. This just means the browser will open up Spotify.

2. Follow Mashable, or send us music by clicking “Send Music.”

3. To send music while browsing tracks within Spotify, follow the MashableHQ account. Then right-click (ctrl + click) on the song you want to send, and click the “Share” option.

4. By default, Spotify pulls up the “Post to Feed” option. Instead, select the “Send to Friend” tab, type in “MashableHQ” and hit the blue “Send” button.

If “MashableHQ” doesn’t show up when you’re trying to send a track, make sure you’re following the account. If you’re still having problems sending a song after that, let us know in the comments, below, and we’ll help you fix the problem.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Topics: Entertainment, fast food, Music, Music Monday, playlist, spotify