http://blog.seaofinfo.com/james-harden-obviously-theres-times-my-defense-is-pretty-bad-i-have-to-be-a-lot-better/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif
When James Harden proclaimed himself the <a href=”http://redirect.viglink.com?key=11fe087258b6fc0532a5ccfc924805c0&u=https%3A%2F%2Fsports.yahoo.com%2Fblogs%2Fnba-ball-dont-lie%2Fjames-harden-says-he-s–the-best-all-around-basketball-player-in-the-nba—sets-high-expectations-204114735.html%22%3E”best all-around basketball player in the NBA” this summer, the claim was met in many quarters with a hearty laugh, followed by a link to one of the supercuts of his poor defense that have gone viral over the past year. As it turns out, the reigning All-NBA First Team shooting guard heard every last chuckle, even all the way over in Spain for the 2014 FIBA World Cup, and while he understands the skepticism regarding both his commitment and capacity to play both ends of the floor, he’s entering the 2014-15 season intent on making us all into believers.
Here’s Harden discussing his defense during the Houston Rockets‘ Monday media session, thanks to ClutchFans:
… and here’s a recap of the chatter, via Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

“I hear [the criticism], but I don’t pay attention to it,” Harden said. “I know I can be a really good defender. Obviously, there’s times my defense is pretty bad. There’s a lot of stars whose defense is pretty bad sometimes. That category, I know I have to be better.”


Harden made similar comments before and after last season, but on Monday he was specific, as if he also had clicked on that video, catching himself looking the other way while his man made a back-door cut or took off on a fast break.


“It’s just [about] me being focused,” Harden said. “It’s not whether I can do it. It’s me losing track of my man or small things like that that can easily be corrected.


“It’s not the fact that I can’t do it. I’m a pretty good defender. It’s me being able to focus on small things that I kind of lose track of. I know that.”

Good on Harden for copping to his missteps and his tendency to fall asleep during possessions; the first step, after all, is admitting that you have a problem. Next, of course, comes doing something about it, and Harden’s still got a ways to go there.
Consider, for example, this report on Harden’s defensive work during Team USA’s pre-World Cup Las Vegas training camp from former longtime college coach Bobby Gonzalez for Sheridan Hoops:

I spoke to several members of the USAB staff, and behind the scenes they were amazed at how good James Harden has become as an overall player since his last tour with Team USA two years ago. The fact that he came in and was focused on being a lockdown defender blew them away.

And watch the re-energized lockdown artist’s less-than-inspiring work during the U.S.’s gold-medal run in Spain:
… Yeah, there’s the lack of focus, all right.
Harden is, of course, right when he notes that it’s something of a time-honored tradition for NBA stars with major scoring and playmaking roles for their teams to take plays off on the defensive end. There’s also a strong argument to be made that the 25-year-old All-Star’s offensive contributions — 25.4 points, 6.1 assists and 4.7 rebounds per game, 9.1 free throw attempts a night, a sterling .618 True Shooting percentage (fifth-best in the league) last season — significantly outweigh his defensive debits.
In fact, as recently suggested by SB Nation’s Tom Ziller, you could even claim that it’s easier to build a contending roster around an elite one-way talent with clear deficiencies on the other side of the ball than it is to build a winner around a more well-rounded star who doesn’t shine as brightly in either direction. While I’m sure Rockets general manager Daryl Morey wouldn’t use the word “easy,” he’s done his level best to craft a strong defensive roster around Harden — bulldog guard Patrick Beverley at the point of attack, stalwart swingman Trevor Ariza on the wing, finally healthy All-Star rim-protector Dwight Howard backstopping it all — to minimize the bearded baller’s fallout while allowing him to maximize his influence on the offensive end.
But there’s a difference between conserving energy and not really trying at all, and it’d obviously give a Houston team that finished 12th in the NBA in points allowed per possession last season a pretty big boost for Harden to go from “total sieve” to “more regularly accountable feet-mover.” The task of keeping Harden accountable falls to head coach Kevin McHale, who’s emphasizing the basics — keep your man in front of you — as he enters his fourth season on the Houston bench, according to NBA.com’s Fran Blinebury:

“Your defense is based on help and help principles. But if [a teammate] gets beat every time, I say, ‘Oh, my God I got to get over and help again.’ If [a teammate] shuts down his guy, there’s a calmness in me. I’m not over-helping. I’m not thinking, ‘Oh my.’


“It’s a trust factor of doing your job on defense. It’s not always relying on the trust that is built in. Your object as a defender is to not use that help all that time. Use it when guys make great moves. You can’t get beat on average moves. You can’t get beat on just average stuff. You gotta just make guys work hard to beat you. It’s simple things.


“In the end, if you play on a team that is [a] championship caliber team, there is a huge amount of trust. That trust comes from you doing your job night after night after night after night, so that everybody can trust each other.”

Through two years as The Man in Houston, Harden hasn’t proven trustworthy on D, and the Rockets haven’t proven capable of getting out of the opening round of the Western Conference playoffs. McHale’s challenging Harden to take a step forward and lead by example on defense, and Harden’s challenging himself to live up to the bold claims he made over the summer. If he puts his money where his mouth is, he could vault Houston into the upper echelon of the brutal West and himself into the MVP conversation. If the start of the season just brings more of the same  lackadaisical work, though, Harden will likely be in the unenviable position of being unable to defend even himself.
- – - – - – -
Dan Devine is an editor for Ball Don’t Lie on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at devine@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter!
Stay connected with Ball Don’t Lie on Twitter @YahooBDL, “Like” BDL on Facebook and follow BDL’s Tumblr for year-round NBA talk, jokes and more.
Sports & Recreation
Basketball
James Harden
Houston Rockets
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/james-harden-obviously-theres-times-my-defense-is-pretty-bad-i-have-to-be-a-lot-better/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

When James Harden proclaimed himself the <a href=”http://redirect.viglink.com?key=11fe087258b6fc0532a5ccfc924805c0&u=https%3A%2F%2Fsports.yahoo.com%2Fblogs%2Fnba-ball-dont-lie%2Fjames-harden-says-he-s–the-best-all-around-basketball-player-in-the-nba—sets-high-expectations-204114735.html%22%3E”best all-around basketball player in the NBA” this summer, the claim was met in many quarters with a hearty laugh, followed by a link to one of the supercuts of his poor defense that have gone viral over the past year. As it turns out, the reigning All-NBA First Team shooting guard heard every last chuckle, even all the way over in Spain for the 2014 FIBA World Cup, and while he understands the skepticism regarding both his commitment and capacity to play both ends of the floor, he’s entering the 2014-15 season intent on making us all into believers.

Here’s Harden discussing his defense during the Houston Rockets‘ Monday media session, thanks to ClutchFans:

… and here’s a recap of the chatter, via Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

“I hear [the criticism], but I don’t pay attention to it,” Harden said. “I know I can be a really good defender. Obviously, there’s times my defense is pretty bad. There’s a lot of stars whose defense is pretty bad sometimes. That category, I know I have to be better.”

Harden made similar comments before and after last season, but on Monday he was specific, as if he also had clicked on that video, catching himself looking the other way while his man made a back-door cut or took off on a fast break.

“It’s just [about] me being focused,” Harden said. “It’s not whether I can do it. It’s me losing track of my man or small things like that that can easily be corrected.

“It’s not the fact that I can’t do it. I’m a pretty good defender. It’s me being able to focus on small things that I kind of lose track of. I know that.”

Good on Harden for copping to his missteps and his tendency to fall asleep during possessions; the first step, after all, is admitting that you have a problem. Next, of course, comes doing something about it, and Harden’s still got a ways to go there.

Consider, for example, this report on Harden’s defensive work during Team USA’s pre-World Cup Las Vegas training camp from former longtime college coach Bobby Gonzalez for Sheridan Hoops:

I spoke to several members of the USAB staff, and behind the scenes they were amazed at how good James Harden has become as an overall player since his last tour with Team USA two years ago. The fact that he came in and was focused on being a lockdown defender blew them away.

And watch the re-energized lockdown artist’s less-than-inspiring work during the U.S.’s gold-medal run in Spain:

… Yeah, there’s the lack of focus, all right.

Harden is, of course, right when he notes that it’s something of a time-honored tradition for NBA stars with major scoring and playmaking roles for their teams to take plays off on the defensive end. There’s also a strong argument to be made that the 25-year-old All-Star’s offensive contributions — 25.4 points, 6.1 assists and 4.7 rebounds per game, 9.1 free throw attempts a night, a sterling .618 True Shooting percentage (fifth-best in the league) last season — significantly outweigh his defensive debits.

In fact, as recently suggested by SB Nation’s Tom Ziller, you could even claim that it’s easier to build a contending roster around an elite one-way talent with clear deficiencies on the other side of the ball than it is to build a winner around a more well-rounded star who doesn’t shine as brightly in either direction. While I’m sure Rockets general manager Daryl Morey wouldn’t use the word “easy,” he’s done his level best to craft a strong defensive roster around Harden — bulldog guard Patrick Beverley at the point of attack, stalwart swingman Trevor Ariza on the wing, finally healthy All-Star rim-protector Dwight Howard backstopping it all — to minimize the bearded baller’s fallout while allowing him to maximize his influence on the offensive end.

But there’s a difference between conserving energy and not really trying at all, and it’d obviously give a Houston team that finished 12th in the NBA in points allowed per possession last season a pretty big boost for Harden to go from “total sieve” to “more regularly accountable feet-mover.” The task of keeping Harden accountable falls to head coach Kevin McHale, who’s emphasizing the basics — keep your man in front of you — as he enters his fourth season on the Houston bench, according to NBA.com’s Fran Blinebury:

“Your defense is based on help and help principles. But if [a teammate] gets beat every time, I say, ‘Oh, my God I got to get over and help again.’ If [a teammate] shuts down his guy, there’s a calmness in me. I’m not over-helping. I’m not thinking, ‘Oh my.’

“It’s a trust factor of doing your job on defense. It’s not always relying on the trust that is built in. Your object as a defender is to not use that help all that time. Use it when guys make great moves. You can’t get beat on average moves. You can’t get beat on just average stuff. You gotta just make guys work hard to beat you. It’s simple things.

“In the end, if you play on a team that is [a] championship caliber team, there is a huge amount of trust. That trust comes from you doing your job night after night after night after night, so that everybody can trust each other.”

Through two years as The Man in Houston, Harden hasn’t proven trustworthy on D, and the Rockets haven’t proven capable of getting out of the opening round of the Western Conference playoffs. McHale’s challenging Harden to take a step forward and lead by example on defense, and Harden’s challenging himself to live up to the bold claims he made over the summer. If he puts his money where his mouth is, he could vault Houston into the upper echelon of the brutal West and himself into the MVP conversation. If the start of the season just brings more of the same  lackadaisical work, though, Harden will likely be in the unenviable position of being unable to defend even himself.

- – - – - – -

Dan Devine is an editor for Ball Don’t Lie on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at devine@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter!

Stay connected with Ball Don’t Lie on Twitter @YahooBDL, “Like” BDL on Facebook and follow BDL’s Tumblr for year-round NBA talk, jokes and more.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/gumroad-launches-an-iphone-app-with-which-users-can-access-their-digital-content/
http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/gumroad-library.jpg?w=738Gumroad, the Kleiner Perkins-backed startup that allows creators to sell digital goods, is launching its first iPhone app today.
However, the app doesn’t actually do what Gumroad is known for — you can’t open it and buy a book, or an album, or what have you. Instead, it allows Gumroad buyers to view the content that they’ve already purchased.
Founder and CEO Sahil Lavingia told me that the company has largely focused on the “creator-side experience,” but he’s come to realize that “a lot of the bottleneck now is on the consumer side.”
Not that downloading content from Gumroad’s website was all that onerous, but Lavingia said people are no longer “used to seeing a download button.” After all, services like Netflix have conditioned us to expect that after you buy content, “You should just hit a button and it starts working immediately.” That’s also the expectation when it comes to accessing that content on multiple devices — again, there are ways to transfer downloaded content between devices on your own, but most people expect it to happen automatically.
With that in mind, the Gumroad app becomes the place where you can read, watch, and listen to your Gumraod content. Once you’ve set things up, any purchases that you make from Gumroad on the web will automatically become available in the app. (By the way, “on the web” doesn’t have to mean on desktop or laptop — Lavingia said that mobile now accounts for 25 to 30 percent of Gumroad’s total.)
I don’t know how many people want to download an app just to listen to, say, one album, but as people buy more from Gumroad, the app should become more useful. As of launch, the company says there are already 8,000 films and videos, 35,000 books and comics, and 15,000 “music products” in the library.
So why not include the ability to actually discover new content and make purchases? I assumed it was because Gumroad didn’t want to pay the Apple transaction fee, but Lavingia said he’s not ruling in-app purchases out for the future. At the same time, he said the initial focus was on “creating an amazing consumption experience.
Lavingia added that he doesn’t see the app as “a distribution play.” Instead, it’s the creators themselves who will continue to promote the content to their fans on social media and elsewhere. And by the way, turning that promotion into purchases should get easier as Twitter rolls out its payment platform, where Gumroad is an initial partner.
You can download the iPhone app here. And yes, there are plans for an Android version, too.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/gumroad-launches-an-iphone-app-with-which-users-can-access-their-digital-content/
http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/gumroad-library.jpg?w=738

Gumroad, the Kleiner Perkins-backed startup that allows creators to sell digital goods, is launching its first iPhone app today.

However, the app doesn’t actually do what Gumroad is known for — you can’t open it and buy a book, or an album, or what have you. Instead, it allows Gumroad buyers to view the content that they’ve already purchased.

Founder and CEO Sahil Lavingia told me that the company has largely focused on the “creator-side experience,” but he’s come to realize that “a lot of the bottleneck now is on the consumer side.”

Not that downloading content from Gumroad’s website was all that onerous, but Lavingia said people are no longer “used to seeing a download button.” After all, services like Netflix have conditioned us to expect that after you buy content, “You should just hit a button and it starts working immediately.” That’s also the expectation when it comes to accessing that content on multiple devices — again, there are ways to transfer downloaded content between devices on your own, but most people expect it to happen automatically.

With that in mind, the Gumroad app becomes the place where you can read, watch, and listen to your Gumraod content. Once you’ve set things up, any purchases that you make from Gumroad on the web will automatically become available in the app. (By the way, “on the web” doesn’t have to mean on desktop or laptop — Lavingia said that mobile now accounts for 25 to 30 percent of Gumroad’s total.)

I don’t know how many people want to download an app just to listen to, say, one album, but as people buy more from Gumroad, the app should become more useful. As of launch, the company says there are already 8,000 films and videos, 35,000 books and comics, and 15,000 “music products” in the library.

So why not include the ability to actually discover new content and make purchases? I assumed it was because Gumroad didn’t want to pay the Apple transaction fee, but Lavingia said he’s not ruling in-app purchases out for the future. At the same time, he said the initial focus was on “creating an amazing consumption experience.

Lavingia added that he doesn’t see the app as “a distribution play.” Instead, it’s the creators themselves who will continue to promote the content to their fans on social media and elsewhere. And by the way, turning that promotion into purchases should get easier as Twitter rolls out its payment platform, where Gumroad is an initial partner.

You can download the iPhone app here. And yes, there are plans for an Android version, too.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/hardline-buddhists-in-myanmar-sri-lanka-strike-anti-islamist-pact/
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By Ranga Sirilal and Shihar Aneez
COLOMBO Tue Sep 30, 2014&#160;10:02pm IST


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By Ranga Sirilal and Shihar Aneez COLOMBO (Reuters) – A Myanmar monk accused of inciting violence against Muslims and a hardline Buddhist group in Sri Lanka said on Tuesday they would work together to rally other Buddhist groups and defend their…
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1 of 2. Buddhist monk Ashin Wirathu looks on during a news conference in Colombo September 30, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Dinuka Liyanawatte










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COLOMBO (Reuters) – A Myanmar monk accused of inciting violence against Muslims and a hardline Buddhist group in Sri Lanka said on Tuesday they would work together to rally other Buddhist groups and defend their faith against militant Islamists.

Ashin Wirathu, who once called himself “the Burmese bin Laden” said the agreement with Sri Lanka’s Bodu Bala Sena (BBS) or “Buddhist Power Force”, was the first step in a broad alliance against conversions by Islamists in the region.

The deal gave no detailed indication what the groups were planning to counter what they said was the risk of Buddhists becoming “victims of conversions by extremists”, but the agreement could stoke anti-Muslim attacks in both countries.

Violence against Muslims in Sri Lanka, where Buddhists make up 70 percent of the 21 million population, has risen since 2012, mirroring the events in Myanmar.

In June, sectarian clashes erupted in two Muslim-majority towns on Sri Lanka’s Sinhalese-dominated southern coast during a protest march led by the BBS.

Wirathu is known for his anti-Islamic sermons, and his “969 movement” has been accused of running a hate campaign against Muslims in Myanmar, where at least 240 people have been killed since June 2012.

“Both Bodu Bala Sena and 969 movement have felt that they must now come forward to derive practical and meaningful ways to address these burning issues which cannot be left for politicians to deal with,” the agreement said.

The groups will work on building networks among Buddhist societies and pool resources to fight for the faith, it said.

Wirathu was the guest of honour at a convention of the Sri Lankan group on Sunday where it announced the plan to work together ahead of a presidential election in Sri Lanka that could be held as early as January.

“The aim is to create an international Buddhist force the way we have a Buddhist force nationally in the country,” said BBS Secretary-General Galagoda Aththe Gnanasara said about the pact struck with Wirathu’s movement.

(Writing by Shihar Aneez; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani and Alison Williams)


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http://blog.seaofinfo.com/hardline-buddhists-in-myanmar-sri-lanka-strike-anti-islamist-pact/
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COLOMBO Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:02pm IST

Buddhist monk Ashin Wirathu looks on during a news conference in Colombo September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte

1 of 2. Buddhist monk Ashin Wirathu looks on during a news conference in Colombo September 30, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Dinuka Liyanawatte

COLOMBO (Reuters) – A Myanmar monk accused of inciting violence against Muslims and a hardline Buddhist group in Sri Lanka said on Tuesday they would work together to rally other Buddhist groups and defend their faith against militant Islamists.

Ashin Wirathu, who once called himself “the Burmese bin Laden” said the agreement with Sri Lanka’s Bodu Bala Sena (BBS) or “Buddhist Power Force”, was the first step in a broad alliance against conversions by Islamists in the region.

The deal gave no detailed indication what the groups were planning to counter what they said was the risk of Buddhists becoming “victims of conversions by extremists”, but the agreement could stoke anti-Muslim attacks in both countries.

Violence against Muslims in Sri Lanka, where Buddhists make up 70 percent of the 21 million population, has risen since 2012, mirroring the events in Myanmar.

In June, sectarian clashes erupted in two Muslim-majority towns on Sri Lanka’s Sinhalese-dominated southern coast during a protest march led by the BBS.

Wirathu is known for his anti-Islamic sermons, and his “969 movement” has been accused of running a hate campaign against Muslims in Myanmar, where at least 240 people have been killed since June 2012.

“Both Bodu Bala Sena and 969 movement have felt that they must now come forward to derive practical and meaningful ways to address these burning issues which cannot be left for politicians to deal with,” the agreement said.

The groups will work on building networks among Buddhist societies and pool resources to fight for the faith, it said.

Wirathu was the guest of honour at a convention of the Sri Lankan group on Sunday where it announced the plan to work together ahead of a presidential election in Sri Lanka that could be held as early as January.

“The aim is to create an international Buddhist force the way we have a Buddhist force nationally in the country,” said BBS Secretary-General Galagoda Aththe Gnanasara said about the pact struck with Wirathu’s movement.

(Writing by Shihar Aneez; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani and Alison Williams)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/

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http://blog.seaofinfo.com/the-gender-politics-of-pockets/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/iphone/lead.jpg?ncpz6hThe iPhone 6 may be the great catalyst in including this oft-ignored aspect of women’s fashion.


I am one of the 10 million people who acquired an iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus ten days ago.
Coming from Planet Android, I wasn’t as put off by the larger dimensions as everyone else in the technosphere seemed to be. But I was, as usual, put off by one thing that both the Apple product and its archnemesis from Google shared: the unpocketability of the phone, particularly by females.
This isn’t a new problem for women. Our skinny jeans have pockets, but there is no way an object bigger than a standard issue ID card fits in the front, and everyone knows that slipping a phone in your back pocket is an invitation for a treacherous dive into a toilet, or a backflip resulting in heartbreaking shatters. Purses have enclosures that were once suitable for the flip phone generation but have since become too snug for newer models. Throwing it into the main compartment seems risky, at best.
More on the New iPhones

Are the New iPhones Too Big for Women’s Hands?
The One-Paragraph iPhone 6 Review
When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone
But the biggest problem might be the lack of pockets in the first place: women’s slacks, dresses, and blazers often have no pockets, or worse, “fake” pockets that serve no utilitarian purpose besides sartorially leading the wearer on to believe they have a handy wardrobe aide, until it’s too late.
So how can an industry that focuses on women—whether it be models or products created primarily for a female demographic—consistently dodge the very people it markets to? Camilla Olsen, creative director of an eponymous high tech fashion firm, points to inherent sexism within the industry. Mid-range fashion is a male dominated business, and those men driven not by form and function, but by design and how fabric best drapes the body.
“I honestly believe the fashion industry is not helping women advance,” Olsen said. And the lack of functional designs for women is one example. “We [women] know clearly we need pockets to carry technology and I think it’s expected we are going to carry a purse. When we’re working we don’t carry purses around. A pocket is a reasonable thing.”
Sara Kozlowski, who works in professional development at the Council of Fashion Designers of America and is a visiting critic with Parsons The New School of Design, is more blunt. She squarely places the blame on fast fashion labels busily churning out copies of high-end designs that aren’t adapted to the lives of a normal person who isn’t strutting down a runway.
“I think when you’re going to the upper price points of designer clothes, people tend to be less conscious of trends and more into quality and longevity,” Kozlowski said. So for them, it makes sense not to design around the latest smartphone model. “But in mid-market, contemporary brands, trends are what drive the industry. In that regard, it’s an epic fail.”
Olsen believes the industry is overly focused on the visual appeal of clothing rather than how it can help women—and men, for that matter—live simpler, easier lives. She thinks it’s this preoccupation that’s kept the fashion industry from becoming relevant in today’s technocentric society.
Women’s slacks, dresses, and blazers often have “fake” pockets that serve no utilitarian purpose besides sartorially leading the wearer on.
“I find it discouraging,” Olson said. “Fashion looks selectively at who they let it and keeps women at a certain place. It’s not helping women move forward in the workplace.” Olsen says that some designers have deemed pockets “too ugly” for clothing, while others simply don’t think women need them. And these decisions, she says, have created a chasm in women’s fashion, and hold women back.
A man can simply swipe up his keys and iPhone on the way to a rendezvous with co-workers and slip them into his pocket. A woman on the way to that same meeting has to either carry those items in her hand, or bring a whole purse with her—a definitive, silent sign that she is a woman.
Fashion fans know that it takes time for new designs to go from runway to the streets, and, in the case of adjusting pockets in fashion, forecasters are looking at Fall 2015 for the earliest adopters of iPhone 6 pocketability. The Spring 2015 lines we saw featured on the latest slew of Fashion Weeks were developed six months before the season, according to Olsen, with designs sketched out about six months before that. Given that the release of iPhone renditions are often top secret affairs, the timetable isn’t looking too promising for pockets in the next year or so. But given that designers have had years of large smartphone designs from other companies beyond the ballyhooed iPhone, expectations for a pocket revolution aren’t too high.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/the-gender-politics-of-pockets/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/iphone/lead.jpg?ncpz6h

The iPhone 6 may be the great catalyst in including this oft-ignored aspect of women’s fashion.

I am one of the 10 million people who acquired an iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus ten days ago.

Coming from Planet Android, I wasn’t as put off by the larger dimensions as everyone else in the technosphere seemed to be. But I was, as usual, put off by one thing that both the Apple product and its archnemesis from Google shared: the unpocketability of the phone, particularly by females.

This isn’t a new problem for women. Our skinny jeans have pockets, but there is no way an object bigger than a standard issue ID card fits in the front, and everyone knows that slipping a phone in your back pocket is an invitation for a treacherous dive into a toilet, or a backflip resulting in heartbreaking shatters. Purses have enclosures that were once suitable for the flip phone generation but have since become too snug for newer models. Throwing it into the main compartment seems risky, at best.


More on the New iPhones


But the biggest problem might be the lack of pockets in the first place: women’s slacks, dresses, and blazers often have no pockets, or worse, “fake” pockets that serve no utilitarian purpose besides sartorially leading the wearer on to believe they have a handy wardrobe aide, until it’s too late.

So how can an industry that focuses on women—whether it be models or products created primarily for a female demographic—consistently dodge the very people it markets to? Camilla Olsen, creative director of an eponymous high tech fashion firm, points to inherent sexism within the industry. Mid-range fashion is a male dominated business, and those men driven not by form and function, but by design and how fabric best drapes the body.

“I honestly believe the fashion industry is not helping women advance,” Olsen said. And the lack of functional designs for women is one example. “We [women] know clearly we need pockets to carry technology and I think it’s expected we are going to carry a purse. When we’re working we don’t carry purses around. A pocket is a reasonable thing.”

Sara Kozlowski, who works in professional development at the Council of Fashion Designers of America and is a visiting critic with Parsons The New School of Design, is more blunt. She squarely places the blame on fast fashion labels busily churning out copies of high-end designs that aren’t adapted to the lives of a normal person who isn’t strutting down a runway.

“I think when you’re going to the upper price points of designer clothes, people tend to be less conscious of trends and more into quality and longevity,” Kozlowski said. So for them, it makes sense not to design around the latest smartphone model. “But in mid-market, contemporary brands, trends are what drive the industry. In that regard, it’s an epic fail.”

Olsen believes the industry is overly focused on the visual appeal of clothing rather than how it can help women—and men, for that matter—live simpler, easier lives. She thinks it’s this preoccupation that’s kept the fashion industry from becoming relevant in today’s technocentric society.

Women’s slacks, dresses, and blazers often have “fake” pockets that serve no utilitarian purpose besides sartorially leading the wearer on.

“I find it discouraging,” Olson said. “Fashion looks selectively at who they let it and keeps women at a certain place. It’s not helping women move forward in the workplace.” Olsen says that some designers have deemed pockets “too ugly” for clothing, while others simply don’t think women need them. And these decisions, she says, have created a chasm in women’s fashion, and hold women back.

A man can simply swipe up his keys and iPhone on the way to a rendezvous with co-workers and slip them into his pocket. A woman on the way to that same meeting has to either carry those items in her hand, or bring a whole purse with her—a definitive, silent sign that she is a woman.

Fashion fans know that it takes time for new designs to go from runway to the streets, and, in the case of adjusting pockets in fashion, forecasters are looking at Fall 2015 for the earliest adopters of iPhone 6 pocketability. The Spring 2015 lines we saw featured on the latest slew of Fashion Weeks were developed six months before the season, according to Olsen, with designs sketched out about six months before that. Given that the release of iPhone renditions are often top secret affairs, the timetable isn’t looking too promising for pockets in the next year or so. But given that designers have had years of large smartphone designs from other companies beyond the ballyhooed iPhone, expectations for a pocket revolution aren’t too high.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/secret-service-chief-white-house-breach-unacceptable-will-never-happen-again/
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Obama Briefed On Discipline Of Secret Service Agent
The White House said Wednesday that U.S. President Barack Obama was briefed on the situation involving three Secret Service agents who were sent home from Obama’s trip to the Netherlands for disciplinary reasons. White House spokesman Jay Carney said Obama supports Secret Service Director Julia Pierson’s &#8220;zero-tolerance&#8221; approach to such matters but had no other comment. The Washington Post reported that the agents were disciplined after going out for a night of drinking and one of the agents was found drunk and passed out in the hallway of a hotel near The Hague a day before the president arrived in Europe. The agency has been trying to restore its straight-laced reputation after a scandal involving prostitutes in Colombia in 2012.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/secret-service-chief-white-house-breach-unacceptable-will-never-happen-again/
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Obama Briefed On Discipline Of Secret Service Agent

The White House said Wednesday that U.S. President Barack Obama was briefed on the situation involving three Secret Service agents who were sent home from Obama’s trip to the Netherlands for disciplinary reasons. White House spokesman Jay Carney said Obama supports Secret Service Director Julia Pierson’s “zero-tolerance” approach to such matters but had no other comment. The Washington Post reported that the agents were disciplined after going out for a night of drinking and one of the agents was found drunk and passed out in the hallway of a hotel near The Hague a day before the president arrived in Europe. The agency has been trying to restore its straight-laced reputation after a scandal involving prostitutes in Colombia in 2012.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/energy-manufacturing-to-lead-modi-obama-talks/
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WASHINGTON Tue Sep 30, 2014&#160;7:46pm IST



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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Barack Obama and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday plan to discuss issues ranging from manufacturing to sanitation as the two leaders aim to deepen ties. Obama and Modi were scheduled to meet at the…
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1 of 3. Prime Minister Narendra Modi bows his head after scattering flower petals at the feet of the Mahatma Gandhi Statue outside the Indian Embassy in Washington September 30, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst



WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Barack Obama and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday plan to discuss issues ranging from manufacturing to sanitation as the two leaders aim to deepen ties.

Obama and Modi were scheduled to meet at the White House at 08:25&#160;pm IST during Modi’s first visit to the United States since taking office in May, part of a larger effort aimed at expanding security partnerships and spurring foreign investment.

“When we meet today in Washington, we will discuss ways in which we can boost manufacturing and expand affordable renewable energy, while sustainably securing the future of our common environment,” Obama and Modi said in a joint opinion piece published in The Washington Post on Tuesday.

“We will discuss ways in which our businesses, scientists and governments can partner as India works to improve the quality, reliability and availability of basic services, especially for the poorest of citizens. In this, the United States stands ready to assist,” the two men wrote.

“An immediate area of concrete support is the ‘Clean India’ campaign, where we will leverage private and civil society innovation, expertise and technology to improve sanitation and hygiene throughout India.”

The meeting comes on the heels of a joint “vision statement” issued after their first get-together at a White House dinner on Monday that laid out their plan to expand and deepen their countries’ strategic partnership.

While efforts have been underway to build stronger ties between the United States and India, one of the world’s most populous countries and a potential counterbalance to China in Asia, the partnership has yet to live up to expectations.

Modi has received a warm welcome in the United States, speaking at the U.N. General Assembly in New York and meeting with various U.S. corporate chief executives. On Tuesday, he was scheduled to meet with other U.S. leaders, including Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner.

He also plans to visit a number of memorials in Washington devoted to Mahatma Gandhi, President Abraham Lincoln and civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.

“We remain committed to the larger effort to integrate South Asia and connect it with markets and people in Central and Southeast Asia,” Obama and Modi wrote in their op-ed.

They also reiterated a commitment to share intelligence and cooperate on security issues. They will also work on health issues that will help in tackling a range of crises from Ebola to malaria, they added.

(Reporting by David Brunnstrom and Susan Heavey; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe)


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WASHINGTON Tue Sep 30, 2014 7:46pm IST

Prime Minister Narendra Modi bows his head after scattering flower petals at the feet of the Mahatma Gandhi Statue outside the Indian Embassy in Washington September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

1 of 3. Prime Minister Narendra Modi bows his head after scattering flower petals at the feet of the Mahatma Gandhi Statue outside the Indian Embassy in Washington September 30, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Barack Obama and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday plan to discuss issues ranging from manufacturing to sanitation as the two leaders aim to deepen ties.

Obama and Modi were scheduled to meet at the White House at 08:25 pm IST during Modi’s first visit to the United States since taking office in May, part of a larger effort aimed at expanding security partnerships and spurring foreign investment.

“When we meet today in Washington, we will discuss ways in which we can boost manufacturing and expand affordable renewable energy, while sustainably securing the future of our common environment,” Obama and Modi said in a joint opinion piece published in The Washington Post on Tuesday.

“We will discuss ways in which our businesses, scientists and governments can partner as India works to improve the quality, reliability and availability of basic services, especially for the poorest of citizens. In this, the United States stands ready to assist,” the two men wrote.

“An immediate area of concrete support is the ‘Clean India’ campaign, where we will leverage private and civil society innovation, expertise and technology to improve sanitation and hygiene throughout India.”

The meeting comes on the heels of a joint “vision statement” issued after their first get-together at a White House dinner on Monday that laid out their plan to expand and deepen their countries’ strategic partnership.

While efforts have been underway to build stronger ties between the United States and India, one of the world’s most populous countries and a potential counterbalance to China in Asia, the partnership has yet to live up to expectations.

Modi has received a warm welcome in the United States, speaking at the U.N. General Assembly in New York and meeting with various U.S. corporate chief executives. On Tuesday, he was scheduled to meet with other U.S. leaders, including Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner.

He also plans to visit a number of memorials in Washington devoted to Mahatma Gandhi, President Abraham Lincoln and civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.

“We remain committed to the larger effort to integrate South Asia and connect it with markets and people in Central and Southeast Asia,” Obama and Modi wrote in their op-ed.

They also reiterated a commitment to share intelligence and cooperate on security issues. They will also work on health issues that will help in tackling a range of crises from Ebola to malaria, they added.

(Reporting by David Brunnstrom and Susan Heavey; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe)

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/mitt-romney-on-2016-well-see-what-happens/
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After months of insisting he was not interested in running for president again, Mitt Romney now says he’s keeping the door open.
“We’ve got a lot of people looking at the race,” the 2012 Republican nominee told the New York Times Magazine when he was asked about the possibility of seeking the nomination in 2016. “We’ll see what happens.”
Romney, who was soundly defeated by President Barack Obama in 2012, has been watching the crop of possible 2016 GOP candidates — including New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul and Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, his former running mate — and what the Times calls the “lack of a clear Republican heir apparent.”
But in June, Romney dismissed talk that a GOP fundraising event he hosted in Park City, Utah — attended by many of those same potential nominees — was a precursor to another presidential run for him.
“I’m not running for president,” Romney said on “Meet the Press.” “I brought a number of the 2016 contenders here to meet with my fundraisers. If I had been running, I wouldn’t be doing that.
“Look, I want to find the best candidate for us to take our message to the American people,” he added. “That we can bring better jobs, higher incomes, and more security globally. We can do that. And I’m convinced that the field of Republican candidates that I’m seeing is in a lot better position to do that than I am.”
The former Massachusetts governor bowed out of his first run for president during the 2008 Republican primaries.
“You know, I’m not Ronald Reagan,” Romney said in February. “And I’m not running for president. We’ve got some very good people who are considering the race. And I’m looking forward to supporting someone who I think will have the best shot of defeating whoever it is the Democrats put up.”
According to the Times, that someone may ultimately be him:

Romney compared the barrage of 2016-related questions to a scene in the film “Dumb and Dumber.” After Jim Carrey’s character is flatly rejected by Lauren Holly, she tells him that there’s a one-in-a-million chance she would change her mind. “So,” Romney told me, embodying the character, “Jim Carrey says, ‘You’re telling me there’s a chance.’”

If he does decide to run, expect to see more of the Romney portrayed in “Mitt,” the documentary about his 2012 campaign.
“One of the big frustrations a lot of us had on the campaign is that people weren’t seeing the guy we all know in private,” Ryan said. “The ‘Mitt’ documentary was a very good picture of that guy.”
Then again, Romney, still haunted by his infamous “47 percent” comment, is not necessarily ready to go unscripted.
“I was talking to one of my political advisers, and I said: ‘If I had to do this again, I’d insist that you literally had a camera on me at all times,” Romney said. “I want to be reminded that this is not off the cuff.”
Related video:
Elections
Politics &amp; Government
Mitt Romney
President Barack Obama
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After months of insisting he was not interested in running for president again, Mitt Romney now says he’s keeping the door open.

“We’ve got a lot of people looking at the race,” the 2012 Republican nominee told the New York Times Magazine when he was asked about the possibility of seeking the nomination in 2016. “We’ll see what happens.”

Romney, who was soundly defeated by President Barack Obama in 2012, has been watching the crop of possible 2016 GOP candidates — including New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul and Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, his former running mate — and what the Times calls the “lack of a clear Republican heir apparent.”

But in June, Romney dismissed talk that a GOP fundraising event he hosted in Park City, Utah — attended by many of those same potential nominees — was a precursor to another presidential run for him.

“I’m not running for president,” Romney said on “Meet the Press.” “I brought a number of the 2016 contenders here to meet with my fundraisers. If I had been running, I wouldn’t be doing that.

“Look, I want to find the best candidate for us to take our message to the American people,” he added. “That we can bring better jobs, higher incomes, and more security globally. We can do that. And I’m convinced that the field of Republican candidates that I’m seeing is in a lot better position to do that than I am.”

The former Massachusetts governor bowed out of his first run for president during the 2008 Republican primaries.

“You know, I’m not Ronald Reagan,” Romney said in February. “And I’m not running for president. We’ve got some very good people who are considering the race. And I’m looking forward to supporting someone who I think will have the best shot of defeating whoever it is the Democrats put up.”

According to the Times, that someone may ultimately be him:

Romney compared the barrage of 2016-related questions to a scene in the film “Dumb and Dumber.” After Jim Carrey’s character is flatly rejected by Lauren Holly, she tells him that there’s a one-in-a-million chance she would change her mind. “So,” Romney told me, embodying the character, “Jim Carrey says, ‘You’re telling me there’s a chance.’”

If he does decide to run, expect to see more of the Romney portrayed in “Mitt,” the documentary about his 2012 campaign.

“One of the big frustrations a lot of us had on the campaign is that people weren’t seeing the guy we all know in private,” Ryan said. “The ‘Mitt’ documentary was a very good picture of that guy.”

Then again, Romney, still haunted by his infamous “47 percent” comment, is not necessarily ready to go unscripted.

“I was talking to one of my political advisers, and I said: ‘If I had to do this again, I’d insist that you literally had a camera on me at all times,” Romney said. “I want to be reminded that this is not off the cuff.”

Related video:

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/payment-network-dwolla-picks-up-a-strategic-9-7m-led-by-cme-group/
http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/7027595009_abeda075d6_k.jpg?w=738On the same day that eBay announced that it plans to spin off its payments business PayPal, a smaller payments competitor has quietly announced another round of funding to continue building out its own platform. Dwolla — the startup that is disrupting payments services by giving users an independent platform to pay each other and avoid high money transfer and bank payment fees — has raised a further $9.7 million in funding led by a new strategic investor, the CME Group.
Publicly-traded CME was formed in 2007 with the merger of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange and the Chicago Board of Trade, and it has made other tech investments — for example as part of a $30 million Series B round for secure messaging app Wickr.
Existing Dwolla investors Andreessen Horowitz, Union Square Ventures, and Village Ventures also participated in this round.
The investment is significant because it opens the door wider for Dwolla’s enterprise activity, and the idea of using its platform as the backend for transactions elsewhere — for example in CME’s own exchanges.
Dwolla up to now has made some significant moves to expand how its platform can be used by consumers and merchants — for example, earlier this year establishing Dwolla Direct to add in an option to link a traditional bank account to a Dwolla account, using a light infrastructure based around APIs to integrate with partners. Having a strategic investor like CME on board, highlights a different and bigger kind of focus. From Dwolla founder and CEO Ben Milne:

“There are a variety of applications for Dwolla’s real-time payment infrastructure, many of which stretch beyond consumers, mobile payments, and government relationships; the true value of what we’ve built is just beginning to be realized. CME Group’s timely involvement investment in Dwolla recognizes the exponential impact that a modernized payment system can have on an economy and its participants. With 150 years of industry leadership, CME Group brings institutional knowledge and a rare perspective on innovation that will help Dwolla accelerate the arrival of these opportunities and solutions to the marketplace.”

The potential of where Dwolla’s infrastructure can be used was also what interested CME. “We believe Dwolla’s real-time infrastructure solutions can benefit the financial ecosystem within which we exist,” said CME’s Mark Fields, who is the MD of its strategic investments operations. Fields is joining Dwolla’s board as part of the investment.
From what we understand, this is not about a pivot for the company: Dwolla will continue to launch more services and partnerships in the markets that it already services. Other partnerships include tie-ups with GoDaddy to power e-invoicing, and more news along these lines should be coming out in the next couple of months.
We’re asking Dwolla for details on how the investment will impact its valuation, and for any details about how specifically it will be working with CME Group — including how it will price transactions in new services. (Today the transaction fee is a flat $0.25.)
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/payment-network-dwolla-picks-up-a-strategic-9-7m-led-by-cme-group/
http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/7027595009_abeda075d6_k.jpg?w=738

On the same day that eBay announced that it plans to spin off its payments business PayPal, a smaller payments competitor has quietly announced another round of funding to continue building out its own platform. Dwolla — the startup that is disrupting payments services by giving users an independent platform to pay each other and avoid high money transfer and bank payment fees — has raised a further $9.7 million in funding led by a new strategic investor, the CME Group.

Publicly-traded CME was formed in 2007 with the merger of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange and the Chicago Board of Trade, and it has made other tech investments — for example as part of a $30 million Series B round for secure messaging app Wickr.

Existing Dwolla investors Andreessen Horowitz, Union Square Ventures, and Village Ventures also participated in this round.

The investment is significant because it opens the door wider for Dwolla’s enterprise activity, and the idea of using its platform as the backend for transactions elsewhere — for example in CME’s own exchanges.

Dwolla up to now has made some significant moves to expand how its platform can be used by consumers and merchants — for example, earlier this year establishing Dwolla Direct to add in an option to link a traditional bank account to a Dwolla account, using a light infrastructure based around APIs to integrate with partners. Having a strategic investor like CME on board, highlights a different and bigger kind of focus. From Dwolla founder and CEO Ben Milne:

“There are a variety of applications for Dwolla’s real-time payment infrastructure, many of which stretch beyond consumers, mobile payments, and government relationships; the true value of what we’ve built is just beginning to be realized. CME Group’s timely involvement investment in Dwolla recognizes the exponential impact that a modernized payment system can have on an economy and its participants. With 150 years of industry leadership, CME Group brings institutional knowledge and a rare perspective on innovation that will help Dwolla accelerate the arrival of these opportunities and solutions to the marketplace.”

The potential of where Dwolla’s infrastructure can be used was also what interested CME. “We believe Dwolla’s real-time infrastructure solutions can benefit the financial ecosystem within which we exist,” said CME’s Mark Fields, who is the MD of its strategic investments operations. Fields is joining Dwolla’s board as part of the investment.

From what we understand, this is not about a pivot for the company: Dwolla will continue to launch more services and partnerships in the markets that it already services. Other partnerships include tie-ups with GoDaddy to power e-invoicing, and more news along these lines should be coming out in the next couple of months.

We’re asking Dwolla for details on how the investment will impact its valuation, and for any details about how specifically it will be working with CME Group — including how it will price transactions in new services. (Today the transaction fee is a flat $0.25.)

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/io9-the-8-strangest-fast-food-movie-tie-ins-jalopnik-the-supercharged-kawasaki-ninja-h2r-is-batshi/
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The 8 strangest fast food movie tie-insThe 8 strangest fast food movie tie-insThe 8 strangest fast food movie tie-ins
It was a bit of an odd week for weird tie-in food products – what with The Walking Dead’s burger made to taste like Human Flesh, and… Read moreRead on


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Most of us don’t like to see ourselves in photographs because we don’t like to see our imperfections. Here are a few tricks anyone can… Read moreRead on
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/io9-the-8-strangest-fast-food-movie-tie-ins-jalopnik-the-supercharged-kawasaki-ninja-h2r-is-batshi/
http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

io9 The 8 strangest fast food movie tie-ins | Jalopnik The Supercharged Kawasaki Ninja H2R Is Batshit Insane | Jezebel OkCupid Casanova Has Some Very Specific Things He Wants to Do With You | Lifehacker How to Look Better in Photos Based on Your Body Type

The 8 strangest fast food movie tie-insThe 8 strangest fast food movie tie-insThe 8 strangest fast food movie tie-ins

It was a bit of an odd week for weird tie-in food products – what with The Walking Dead’s burger made to taste like Human Flesh, and… Read moreRead on

​The Supercharged Kawasaki Ninja H2R Is Batshit Insane​The Supercharged Kawasaki Ninja H2R Is Batshit Insane​The Supercharged Kawasaki Ninja H2R Is Batshit…

The Ninja H2R is something completely different from Kawasaki. It’s supercharged, has a trellis frame, carbon fairings, and freaking wings. This … Read moreRead on

OkCupid Casanova Has Some Very Specific Things He Wants to Do With YouOkCupid Casanova Has Some Very Specific Things He Wants to Do With YouOkCupid Casanova Has Some Very Specific Things …

It’s Monday, which means it’s time for your daily dose of WTF from OkCupid, the site that brings people together to find love but also ask… Read moreRead on

How to Look Better in Photos Based on Your Body TypeHow to Look Better in Photos Based on Your Body TypeHow to Look Better in Photos Based on Your Body…

Most of us don’t like to see ourselves in photographs because we don’t like to see our imperfections. Here are a few tricks anyone can… Read moreRead on

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/how-serious-is-the-supreme-court-about-religious-freedom-2/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/5311280901_eaa0ea665e_b/lead.jpg?nch5ccA new case will test whether the justices’ defense of conscience in Hobby Lobby applies to minority religions like Muslims, or just to Christians.

jenny downing/Flickr

Religious freedom in the United States has ebbed and flowed between two competing concepts: the principled view that religion is a matter of individual conscience that cannot be invaded by the government, and the practical concern once expressed by Justice Antonin Scalia that accommodating all religious practices in our diverse society would be “courting anarchy.” In June, the Supreme Court ruled in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that closely held corporations, whose owners objected to contraception on account of sincere Christian beliefs, could not be forced by the Affordable Care Act to include certain contraceptives in their employee insurance plans. In supporting the religious rights of business owners over a national health-care policy predicated on broad participation, the Roberts Court seemed to stake its place on the more protective end of the religious-freedom spectrum.
But the idea that Hobby Lobby creates robust protections will be credible only if the justices are willing to recognize the religious freedom of marginalized religious minorities—not just the Judeo-Christian tradition. The next religious-freedom case to come before the Court, Holt v. Hobbs, will test whether the Roberts Court’s stance on religious freedom includes a minority faith, Islam, practiced by a disfavored member of our society: a prisoner. At stake are both the state of religious freedom in the country and the Court’s reputation.
Related Story

Hobby Lobby Is Already Creating New Religious Demands on Obama
Holt involves Gregory Holt, an inmate in Arkansas also known as Abdul Maalik Muhammad. A dispute arose between Holt and the state’s Department of Correction when he sought to grow a one-half-inch beard in observance of his faith. According to the department’s grooming policies, inmates may only grow a “neatly trimmed mustache.” In 2011, Holt filed a lawsuit against the director of the department, Ray Hobbs, and other state employees, saying that the prison had violated his religious rights. After decisions by federal trial and appeals courts in favor of the department, Holt filed a hand-written petition to the Supreme Court, which agreed to review the case. The justices are scheduled to hear arguments in Holt on October 7.
If Hobby Lobby and federal law are faithfully applied, Holt should prevail. Prisoners surrender many of their rights at the prison gates. “Lawful incarceration brings about the necessary withdrawal or limitation of many privileges and rights,” the Supreme Court wrote in Price v. Johnston more than 60 years ago. In 2000, however, Congress enacted the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA) to help safeguard inmates’ religious freedom. The law states that the government may not place a substantial burden on a prisoner’s ability to practice his or her religion unless that burden is the “least-restrictive means” to achieve a “compelling” goal.
This standard may sound familiar—RLUIPA is the sister statute to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, the federal law which was at issue in Hobby Lobby. These laws apply to different laws implicating religious freedom—RFRA only to federal laws and RLUIPA to the land use and prison contexts—but both ask whether a religious burden is the “least-restrictive means” of accomplishing the government’s “compelling” goals.
In this case, there is no dispute that the prison regulations substantially burden Holt’s religious freedom. His Hobson’s choice—either obey the prison grooming policies and violate his religious beliefs, or adhere to his conscience and face disciplinary measures—is a quintessential substantial burden.
But the prison authorities have a “compelling” reason to restrict Holt’s ability to practice his religion. In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court simply assumed the federal government had sufficient reasons for requiring contraceptive coverage. In Holt, it will likely agree with the department’s position that the “no-beard policy enhances prison safety and security by removing an important hiding place for contraband and by facilitating the identification of inmates who wish to engage in violence or escape.” On their own, however, these reasons don’t seem to be enough to satisfy RLUIPA. The regulations will also have to pass the statute’s “least restrictive means” test: The government must meet its goals in the way that best preserves religious liberty. This was also the sticking point in Hobby Lobby. In that case, the government had already made exemptions for religious nonprofit organizations, which undermined its argument that religious exemptions could not be made for certain for-profit corporations. Holt involves a similar situation: Arkansas’s prisons already offer medical exemptions to their grooming policies, which makes it difficult to argue that religious exemptions are not possible. As a federal appeals court wrote in Fraternal Order of Police v. City of Newark, which concerned Newark’s police-department grooming policies, “We are at a loss to understand why religious exemptions threaten important city interests but medical exemptions do not.” The decision was written by then-Judge Samuel Alito, author of the Hobby Lobby opinion.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/how-serious-is-the-supreme-court-about-religious-freedom-2/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/5311280901_eaa0ea665e_b/lead.jpg?nch5cc

A new case will test whether the justices’ defense of conscience in Hobby Lobby applies to minority religions like Muslims, or just to Christians.

jenny downing/Flickr

Religious freedom in the United States has ebbed and flowed between two competing concepts: the principled view that religion is a matter of individual conscience that cannot be invaded by the government, and the practical concern once expressed by Justice Antonin Scalia that accommodating all religious practices in our diverse society would be “courting anarchy.” In June, the Supreme Court ruled in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that closely held corporations, whose owners objected to contraception on account of sincere Christian beliefs, could not be forced by the Affordable Care Act to include certain contraceptives in their employee insurance plans. In supporting the religious rights of business owners over a national health-care policy predicated on broad participation, the Roberts Court seemed to stake its place on the more protective end of the religious-freedom spectrum.

But the idea that Hobby Lobby creates robust protections will be credible only if the justices are willing to recognize the religious freedom of marginalized religious minorities—not just the Judeo-Christian tradition. The next religious-freedom case to come before the Court, Holt v. Hobbs, will test whether the Roberts Court’s stance on religious freedom includes a minority faith, Islam, practiced by a disfavored member of our society: a prisoner. At stake are both the state of religious freedom in the country and the Court’s reputation.


Related Story

Hobby Lobby Is Already Creating New Religious Demands on Obama


Holt involves Gregory Holt, an inmate in Arkansas also known as Abdul Maalik Muhammad. A dispute arose between Holt and the state’s Department of Correction when he sought to grow a one-half-inch beard in observance of his faith. According to the department’s grooming policies, inmates may only grow a “neatly trimmed mustache.” In 2011, Holt filed a lawsuit against the director of the department, Ray Hobbs, and other state employees, saying that the prison had violated his religious rights. After decisions by federal trial and appeals courts in favor of the department, Holt filed a hand-written petition to the Supreme Court, which agreed to review the case. The justices are scheduled to hear arguments in Holt on October 7.

If Hobby Lobby and federal law are faithfully applied, Holt should prevail. Prisoners surrender many of their rights at the prison gates. “Lawful incarceration brings about the necessary withdrawal or limitation of many privileges and rights,” the Supreme Court wrote in Price v. Johnston more than 60 years ago. In 2000, however, Congress enacted the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA) to help safeguard inmates’ religious freedom. The law states that the government may not place a substantial burden on a prisoner’s ability to practice his or her religion unless that burden is the “least-restrictive means” to achieve a “compelling” goal.

This standard may sound familiar—RLUIPA is the sister statute to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, the federal law which was at issue in Hobby Lobby. These laws apply to different laws implicating religious freedom—RFRA only to federal laws and RLUIPA to the land use and prison contexts—but both ask whether a religious burden is the “least-restrictive means” of accomplishing the government’s “compelling” goals.

In this case, there is no dispute that the prison regulations substantially burden Holt’s religious freedom. His Hobson’s choice—either obey the prison grooming policies and violate his religious beliefs, or adhere to his conscience and face disciplinary measures—is a quintessential substantial burden.

But the prison authorities have a “compelling” reason to restrict Holt’s ability to practice his religion. In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court simply assumed the federal government had sufficient reasons for requiring contraceptive coverage. In Holt, it will likely agree with the department’s position that the “no-beard policy enhances prison safety and security by removing an important hiding place for contraband and by facilitating the identification of inmates who wish to engage in violence or escape.” On their own, however, these reasons don’t seem to be enough to satisfy RLUIPA. The regulations will also have to pass the statute’s “least restrictive means” test: The government must meet its goals in the way that best preserves religious liberty. This was also the sticking point in Hobby Lobby. In that case, the government had already made exemptions for religious nonprofit organizations, which undermined its argument that religious exemptions could not be made for certain for-profit corporations. Holt involves a similar situation: Arkansas’s prisons already offer medical exemptions to their grooming policies, which makes it difficult to argue that religious exemptions are not possible. As a federal appeals court wrote in Fraternal Order of Police v. City of Newark, which concerned Newark’s police-department grooming policies, “We are at a loss to understand why religious exemptions threaten important city interests but medical exemptions do not.” The decision was written by then-Judge Samuel Alito, author of the Hobby Lobby opinion.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/how-serious-is-the-supreme-court-about-religious-freedom/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/5311280901_eaa0ea665e_b/lead.jpg?nch5ccA new case will test whether the justices’ defense of conscience in Hobby Lobby applies to minority religions like Muslims, or just to Christians.

jenny downing/Flickr

Religious freedom in the United States has ebbed and flowed between two competing concepts: the principled view that religion is a matter of individual conscience that cannot be invaded by the government, and the practical concern once expressed by Justice Antonin Scalia that accommodating all religious practices in our diverse society would be “courting anarchy.” In June, the Supreme Court ruled in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that closely held corporations, whose owners objected to contraception on account of sincere Christian beliefs, could not be forced by the Affordable Care Act to include certain contraceptives in their employee insurance plans. In supporting the religious rights of business owners over a national health-care policy predicated on broad participation, the Roberts Court seemed to stake its place on the more protective end of the religious-freedom spectrum.
But the idea that Hobby Lobby creates robust protections will be credible only if the justices are willing to recognize the religious freedom of marginalized religious minorities—not just the Judeo-Christian tradition. The next religious-freedom case to come before the Court, Holt v. Hobbs, will test whether the Roberts Court’s stance on religious freedom includes a minority faith, Islam, practiced by a disfavored member of our society: a prisoner. At stake are both the state of religious freedom in the country and the Court’s reputation.
Related Story

Hobby Lobby Is Already Creating New Religious Demands on Obama
Holt involves Gregory Holt, an inmate in Arkansas also known as Abdul Maalik Muhammad. A dispute arose between Holt and the state’s Department of Correction when he sought to grow a one-half-inch beard in observance of his faith. According to the department’s grooming policies, inmates may only grow a “neatly trimmed mustache.” In 2011, Holt filed a lawsuit against the director of the department, Ray Hobbs, and other state employees, saying that the prison had violated his religious rights. After decisions by federal trial and appeals courts in favor of the department, Holt filed a hand-written petition to the Supreme Court, which agreed to review the case. The justices are scheduled to hear arguments in Holt on October 7.
If Hobby Lobby and federal law are faithfully applied, Holt should prevail. Prisoners surrender many of their rights at the prison gates. “Lawful incarceration brings about the necessary withdrawal or limitation of many privileges and rights,” the Supreme Court wrote in Price v. Johnston more than 60 years ago. In 2000, however, Congress enacted the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA) to help safeguard inmates’ religious freedom. The law states that the government may not place a substantial burden on a prisoner’s ability to practice his or her religion unless that burden is the “least-restrictive means” to achieve a “compelling” goal.
This standard may sound familiar—RLUIPA is the sister statute to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, the federal law which was at issue in Hobby Lobby. These laws apply to different laws implicating religious freedom—RFRA only to federal laws and RLUIPA to the land use and prison contexts—but both ask whether a religious burden is the “least-restrictive means” of accomplishing the government’s “compelling” goals.
In this case, there is no dispute that the prison regulations substantially burden Holt’s religious freedom. His Hobson’s choice—either obey the prison grooming policies and violate his religious beliefs, or adhere to his conscience and face disciplinary measures—is a quintessential substantial burden.
But the prison authorities have a “compelling” reason to restrict Holt’s ability to practice his religion. In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court simply assumed the federal government had sufficient reasons for requiring contraceptive coverage. In Holt, it will likely agree with the department’s position that the “no-beard policy enhances prison safety and security by removing an important hiding place for contraband and by facilitating the identification of inmates who wish to engage in violence or escape.” On their own, however, these reasons don’t seem to be enough to satisfy RLUIPA. The regulations will also have to pass the statute’s “least restrictive means” test: The government must meet its goals in the way that best preserves religious liberty. This was also the sticking point in Hobby Lobby. In that case, the government had already made exemptions for religious nonprofit organizations, which undermined its argument that religious exemptions could not be made for certain for-profit corporations. Holt involves a similar situation: Arkansas’s prisons already offer medical exemptions to their grooming policies, which makes it difficult to argue that religious exemptions are not possible. As a federal appeals court wrote in Fraternal Order of Police v. City of Newark, which concerned Newark’s police-department grooming policies, “We are at a loss to understand why religious exemptions threaten important city interests but medical exemptions do not.” The decision was written by then-Judge Samuel Alito, author of the Hobby Lobby opinion.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/how-serious-is-the-supreme-court-about-religious-freedom/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/5311280901_eaa0ea665e_b/lead.jpg?nch5cc

A new case will test whether the justices’ defense of conscience in Hobby Lobby applies to minority religions like Muslims, or just to Christians.

jenny downing/Flickr

Religious freedom in the United States has ebbed and flowed between two competing concepts: the principled view that religion is a matter of individual conscience that cannot be invaded by the government, and the practical concern once expressed by Justice Antonin Scalia that accommodating all religious practices in our diverse society would be “courting anarchy.” In June, the Supreme Court ruled in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that closely held corporations, whose owners objected to contraception on account of sincere Christian beliefs, could not be forced by the Affordable Care Act to include certain contraceptives in their employee insurance plans. In supporting the religious rights of business owners over a national health-care policy predicated on broad participation, the Roberts Court seemed to stake its place on the more protective end of the religious-freedom spectrum.

But the idea that Hobby Lobby creates robust protections will be credible only if the justices are willing to recognize the religious freedom of marginalized religious minorities—not just the Judeo-Christian tradition. The next religious-freedom case to come before the Court, Holt v. Hobbs, will test whether the Roberts Court’s stance on religious freedom includes a minority faith, Islam, practiced by a disfavored member of our society: a prisoner. At stake are both the state of religious freedom in the country and the Court’s reputation.


Related Story

Hobby Lobby Is Already Creating New Religious Demands on Obama


Holt involves Gregory Holt, an inmate in Arkansas also known as Abdul Maalik Muhammad. A dispute arose between Holt and the state’s Department of Correction when he sought to grow a one-half-inch beard in observance of his faith. According to the department’s grooming policies, inmates may only grow a “neatly trimmed mustache.” In 2011, Holt filed a lawsuit against the director of the department, Ray Hobbs, and other state employees, saying that the prison had violated his religious rights. After decisions by federal trial and appeals courts in favor of the department, Holt filed a hand-written petition to the Supreme Court, which agreed to review the case. The justices are scheduled to hear arguments in Holt on October 7.

If Hobby Lobby and federal law are faithfully applied, Holt should prevail. Prisoners surrender many of their rights at the prison gates. “Lawful incarceration brings about the necessary withdrawal or limitation of many privileges and rights,” the Supreme Court wrote in Price v. Johnston more than 60 years ago. In 2000, however, Congress enacted the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA) to help safeguard inmates’ religious freedom. The law states that the government may not place a substantial burden on a prisoner’s ability to practice his or her religion unless that burden is the “least-restrictive means” to achieve a “compelling” goal.

This standard may sound familiar—RLUIPA is the sister statute to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, the federal law which was at issue in Hobby Lobby. These laws apply to different laws implicating religious freedom—RFRA only to federal laws and RLUIPA to the land use and prison contexts—but both ask whether a religious burden is the “least-restrictive means” of accomplishing the government’s “compelling” goals.

In this case, there is no dispute that the prison regulations substantially burden Holt’s religious freedom. His Hobson’s choice—either obey the prison grooming policies and violate his religious beliefs, or adhere to his conscience and face disciplinary measures—is a quintessential substantial burden.

But the prison authorities have a “compelling” reason to restrict Holt’s ability to practice his religion. In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court simply assumed the federal government had sufficient reasons for requiring contraceptive coverage. In Holt, it will likely agree with the department’s position that the “no-beard policy enhances prison safety and security by removing an important hiding place for contraband and by facilitating the identification of inmates who wish to engage in violence or escape.” On their own, however, these reasons don’t seem to be enough to satisfy RLUIPA. The regulations will also have to pass the statute’s “least restrictive means” test: The government must meet its goals in the way that best preserves religious liberty. This was also the sticking point in Hobby Lobby. In that case, the government had already made exemptions for religious nonprofit organizations, which undermined its argument that religious exemptions could not be made for certain for-profit corporations. Holt involves a similar situation: Arkansas’s prisons already offer medical exemptions to their grooming policies, which makes it difficult to argue that religious exemptions are not possible. As a federal appeals court wrote in Fraternal Order of Police v. City of Newark, which concerned Newark’s police-department grooming policies, “We are at a loss to understand why religious exemptions threaten important city interests but medical exemptions do not.” The decision was written by then-Judge Samuel Alito, author of the Hobby Lobby opinion.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/express-yourself-with-these-17-emoji-accessories/
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What’s This?

By Tricia Gilbride2014-09-30&#160;11:30:14 UTC

If you’re lost in real life without emoji to let people know how you feel, have no fear. Your favorite characters don’t have to be sequestered to your iPhone screen any longer.
There are emoji accessories that will cover your lifestyle head to toe, from 14K gold earrings to nail decals. You’ll never have to actually laugh or cry ever again.

See also: 10 Ways to Spice Up Your Relationship in Emoji

Check out a few of our favorite emoji-inspired Etsy finds for every budget and emotion.

















Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.
Topics: emoji, Etsy, Pics, Travel &amp; Leisure, Watercooler
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/express-yourself-with-these-17-emoji-accessories/
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What’s This?

If you’re lost in real life without emoji to let people know how you feel, have no fear. Your favorite characters don’t have to be sequestered to your iPhone screen any longer.

There are emoji accessories that will cover your lifestyle head to toe, from 14K gold earrings to nail decals. You’ll never have to actually laugh or cry ever again.

Check out a few of our favorite emoji-inspired Etsy finds for every budget and emotion.

  1. 100-earrings
  2. Alien-emoji-necklace
  3. Cant-even-sweatshirt
  4. Emoji-patches
  5. Cat-emoji-shirt
  6. Emoji-coin-purse
  7. Emoji-sweatpants
  8. Emoji-nail-decals
  9. Girl-emoji-earrings
  10. Moon-tote-bag
  11. Poop-emoji-slip-ons
  12. Il_fullxfull-657928707_8g62
  13. Ghost-emoji-stamp
  14. Palm-tree-necklace
  15. Breaking-bad-emoji-mug
  16. Emoji-stickers
  17. Emoji-print-phone-case

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Topics: emoji, Etsy, Pics, Travel & Leisure, Watercooler

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/30-years-of-coens-closing-thoughts-and-rankings/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/RTX162M8/lead.jpg?ncp3tf
David McNew/Reuters

In honor of the 30th anniversary of the Coen brothers’ debut, Blood Simple, I re-watched all 16 of their feature films and jotted down observations on one per day, in order of their release. For a fuller explanation of the project, see my first entry, on Blood Simple. (Here, too, are my entries on Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, Fargo, The Big Lebowski, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Man Who Wasn’t There, Intolerable Cruelty, The Ladykillers, No Country For Old Men, Burn After Reading, A Serious Man, True Grit, and Inside Llewyn Davis. The landing page for the whole series is here.)
Some Closing Thoughts
So, to quote J. K. Simmons in his magisterially wicked coda to Burn After Reading, “What did we learn, Palmer?”
• Well, for my part, I learned a few things. Foremost, I learned that the Coens have made an awful lot of movies. I knew that before I started, of course. But 16 films in 16 days feels like a whole lot more on the way out than it did on the way in. It’s going to be a while before I can engage with any book, movie, or TV show without reflexively trying to place it within the Coens’ oeuvre. If I ever repeat this experiment, it will probably be with a less prolific artist. Terrence Malick, maybe?
Related Story

30 Years of Coens: Inside Llewyn Davis
• More significantly, I learned—or rather re-learned—that the Coens have made an awful lot of really good movies. Out of all 16 features, I enjoyed re-watching all but two: The Ladykillers, which I have always considered their worst effort by orders of magnitude; and, somewhat to my surprise, The Hudsucker Proxy, which I’d always placed in their bottom tier, but which I had looked forward to giving another try. Unlike their other interesting misfires—Intolerable Cruelty, The Man Who Wasn’t There, etc.—I wound up liking Hudsucker considerably less this time around than I had before. Maybe next time….
• With that, let me offer my final ranking of the Coens’ films to date. And by “final,” I mean final right now, at the moment I’m writing this: I reserve the right to revisit any one of them at any time—including as a consequence of the first crosswise comment I receive. I’d done my best to rate the movies as I went through them (though careful readers noticed I had to bump A Serious Man up a slot or two), but in doing so I realized that an awful lot of my rankings felt highly fungible. So rather than make a simple numerical list, I thought it would be more honest to rank them in tiers.
Numbers 1 to 3: Miller’s Crossing, Fargo, No Country for Old Men. With all due respect for the Coens’ comedies (and much respect is due), I find these three films in a category of their own, and I could rank them in pretty much any sequence depending on the criteria by which they were judged: Miller’s Crossing is—and I suspect will always be—my favorite; Fargo is their most delicately balanced; and No Country comes the closest to outright perfection in execution. I look forward to watching all three many more times in years to come.
Number 4: Raising Arizona. Rationally, I suspect that this movie belongs in the next tier down. But Raising Arizona was the go-to comedy of my college years and that gives it a sentimental boost the others can’t quite touch. Had any of them been released in 1987, they’d probably hold this spot instead.
Numbers 5 to 8: Blood Simple, The Big Lebowski, Burn After Reading, Inside Llewyn Davis. For most filmmakers, this would constitute a pretty terrific top four. In the case of the Coens, these are great movies that, for me, aren’t their greatest. I was torn over whether to put Llewyn Davis in this tier or the one below, but in the pleasant afterglow of this latest viewing I’m giving it the benefit of the doubt.
Numbers 9 through 14: Barton Fink, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Man Who Wasn’t There, Intolerable Cruelty, A Serious Man, True Grit. The good-but-not-quite-great category. Some of the movies here (e.g., Barton Fink) I find admirable but not particularly enjoyable; with others (e.g., Intolerable Cruelty), it’s the reverse. I had a good time re-watching all of these pictures, but I’m unlikely to revisit them again anytime soon.
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/30-years-of-coens-closing-thoughts-and-rankings/
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/newsroom/img/mt/2014/09/RTX162M8/lead.jpg?ncp3tf

David McNew/Reuters

In honor of the 30th anniversary of the Coen brothers’ debut, Blood Simple, I re-watched all 16 of their feature films and jotted down observations on one per day, in order of their release. For a fuller explanation of the project, see my first entry, on Blood Simple. (Here, too, are my entries on Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, Fargo, The Big Lebowski, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Man Who Wasn’t There, Intolerable Cruelty, The Ladykillers, No Country For Old Men, Burn After Reading, A Serious Man, True Grit, and Inside Llewyn Davis. The landing page for the whole series is here.)

Some Closing Thoughts

So, to quote J. K. Simmons in his magisterially wicked coda to Burn After Reading, “What did we learn, Palmer?”

Well, for my part, I learned a few things. Foremost, I learned that the Coens have made an awful lot of movies. I knew that before I started, of course. But 16 films in 16 days feels like a whole lot more on the way out than it did on the way in. It’s going to be a while before I can engage with any book, movie, or TV show without reflexively trying to place it within the Coens’ oeuvre. If I ever repeat this experiment, it will probably be with a less prolific artist. Terrence Malick, maybe?


Related Story

30 Years of Coens: Inside Llewyn Davis


More significantly, I learned—or rather re-learned—that the Coens have made an awful lot of really good movies. Out of all 16 features, I enjoyed re-watching all but two: The Ladykillers, which I have always considered their worst effort by orders of magnitude; and, somewhat to my surprise, The Hudsucker Proxy, which I’d always placed in their bottom tier, but which I had looked forward to giving another try. Unlike their other interesting misfires—Intolerable Cruelty, The Man Who Wasn’t There, etc.—I wound up liking Hudsucker considerably less this time around than I had before. Maybe next time….

With that, let me offer my final ranking of the Coens’ films to date. And by “final,” I mean final right now, at the moment I’m writing this: I reserve the right to revisit any one of them at any time—including as a consequence of the first crosswise comment I receive. I’d done my best to rate the movies as I went through them (though careful readers noticed I had to bump A Serious Man up a slot or two), but in doing so I realized that an awful lot of my rankings felt highly fungible. So rather than make a simple numerical list, I thought it would be more honest to rank them in tiers.

Numbers 1 to 3: Miller’s Crossing, Fargo, No Country for Old Men. With all due respect for the Coens’ comedies (and much respect is due), I find these three films in a category of their own, and I could rank them in pretty much any sequence depending on the criteria by which they were judged: Miller’s Crossing is—and I suspect will always be—my favorite; Fargo is their most delicately balanced; and No Country comes the closest to outright perfection in execution. I look forward to watching all three many more times in years to come.

Number 4: Raising Arizona. Rationally, I suspect that this movie belongs in the next tier down. But Raising Arizona was the go-to comedy of my college years and that gives it a sentimental boost the others can’t quite touch. Had any of them been released in 1987, they’d probably hold this spot instead.

Numbers 5 to 8: Blood Simple, The Big Lebowski, Burn After Reading, Inside Llewyn Davis. For most filmmakers, this would constitute a pretty terrific top four. In the case of the Coens, these are great movies that, for me, aren’t their greatest. I was torn over whether to put Llewyn Davis in this tier or the one below, but in the pleasant afterglow of this latest viewing I’m giving it the benefit of the doubt.

Numbers 9 through 14: Barton Fink, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Man Who Wasn’t There, Intolerable Cruelty, A Serious Man, True Grit. The good-but-not-quite-great category. Some of the movies here (e.g., Barton Fink) I find admirable but not particularly enjoyable; with others (e.g., Intolerable Cruelty), it’s the reverse. I had a good time re-watching all of these pictures, but I’m unlikely to revisit them again anytime soon.

http://blog.seaofinfo.com/tokyo-film-fest-to-focus-on-anime-asia-and-middle-east/
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The ‘Ultra monsters,’ pose during a photo session at the 26th Tokyo International Film Festival opening green carpet event in Tokyo on October 17, 2013 (AFP Photo/Toshifumi Kitamura)
http://blog.seaofinfo.com/future-news-arsenal-physio-admits-his-fear-of-being-alone-is-behind-clubs-injury-problems/
http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/3o08XrHOmu8.lqaMVddswg&#8212;/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTc1/http://mit.zenfs.com/210/2013/10/25013_427516562048_2086068_n-1.jpg
Arsenal physio Terry Sminter has admitted that the club’s ongoing injury crisis is down to his crippling fear of being alone. Aaron Ramsey, Mikel Arteta and Jack Wilshere all suffered injuries during Arsenal’s 1-1 draw against Tottenham, continuing a problem that has plagued the club for years. And now Sminter has confessed to his part in the matter.
“The players are all great lads,” Sminter told reporters convened at Arsenal’s London Colney training complex for an entirely different reason. “When we’re together we have such fun telling jokes at each other’s expense. Mostly mine, though. I must admit I’m an easy target, with my ears the way they are and that noise I make when I breathe. We just laugh and laugh. Again, almost exclusively at me. But whenever I say that we should all hang out, like a night on the town chatting up ladies and eating small foods like the kinds they have in television adverts for body spray, they always say they’re too busy. And I understand that. Footballers have busy, amazing lives that I often dream about having for myself. But since we can’t hang out in public fun zones, I do what I can to make sure they spend as much time as possible with me in the physio’s room. I don’t like when they get hurt, but I do like when we laugh about my asymmetrical chin together. And if they have to be hurt for us to do that together, then so be it.”
Arsenal have endured a total of 741 injuries over the last decade, which is 90 more than Manchester United and 243 more than Chelsea, according to PhysioRoom.com data compiled by Project Babb. Though this has caused the club frustration and a reputation of fragility, it has brought Sminter a degree of personal fulfillment.
“Over the years I’ve convinced the players that yawns count as stretching and sleeping with weights on your legs will make them stronger,” the physio added. “Remember when Antonio Reyes had his wisdom teeth out in 2006? His teeth were fine. I just wanted someone to play Jenga with. Abou Diaby and I have watched every episode of Doctor Who twice. I’m sorry if that’s harmed the club. That was never my intention. But what am I supposed to do if everyone is healthy all the time? A man can only take several thousand pictures of himself crying just to know he definitely exists before the memory on his phone is full. Even if it doesn’t have any contact numbers in it.”
It’s unclear whether Arsenal will sack Sminter in light of this revelation, but he feels he still has much to offer the club.
“No other physio can finish the 100,000 piece jigsaw puzzle I started with Jack Wilshere or convince Olivier Giroud that eating coins will make him run faster,” Sminter concluded. “I think trouble on the pitch is a small price to pay for lasting memories in the physio’s room. And isn’t that what football is really all about?”
This has been Future News: news from the future.
- – - – - – -

Brooks Peck is the editor of Dirty Tackle on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him or follow on Twitter! 
Soccer
Sports &amp; Recreation
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http://blog.seaofinfo.com/future-news-arsenal-physio-admits-his-fear-of-being-alone-is-behind-clubs-injury-problems/
http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/3o08XrHOmu8.lqaMVddswg—/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTc1/http://mit.zenfs.com/210/2013/10/25013_427516562048_2086068_n-1.jpg

Arsenal physio Terry Sminter has admitted that the club’s ongoing injury crisis is down to his crippling fear of being alone. Aaron Ramsey, Mikel Arteta and Jack Wilshere all suffered injuries during Arsenal’s 1-1 draw against Tottenham, continuing a problem that has plagued the club for years. And now Sminter has confessed to his part in the matter.

“The players are all great lads,” Sminter told reporters convened at Arsenal’s London Colney training complex for an entirely different reason. “When we’re together we have such fun telling jokes at each other’s expense. Mostly mine, though. I must admit I’m an easy target, with my ears the way they are and that noise I make when I breathe. We just laugh and laugh. Again, almost exclusively at me. But whenever I say that we should all hang out, like a night on the town chatting up ladies and eating small foods like the kinds they have in television adverts for body spray, they always say they’re too busy. And I understand that. Footballers have busy, amazing lives that I often dream about having for myself. But since we can’t hang out in public fun zones, I do what I can to make sure they spend as much time as possible with me in the physio’s room. I don’t like when they get hurt, but I do like when we laugh about my asymmetrical chin together. And if they have to be hurt for us to do that together, then so be it.”

Arsenal have endured a total of 741 injuries over the last decade, which is 90 more than Manchester United and 243 more than Chelsea, according to PhysioRoom.com data compiled by Project Babb. Though this has caused the club frustration and a reputation of fragility, it has brought Sminter a degree of personal fulfillment.

“Over the years I’ve convinced the players that yawns count as stretching and sleeping with weights on your legs will make them stronger,” the physio added. “Remember when Antonio Reyes had his wisdom teeth out in 2006? His teeth were fine. I just wanted someone to play Jenga with. Abou Diaby and I have watched every episode of Doctor Who twice. I’m sorry if that’s harmed the club. That was never my intention. But what am I supposed to do if everyone is healthy all the time? A man can only take several thousand pictures of himself crying just to know he definitely exists before the memory on his phone is full. Even if it doesn’t have any contact numbers in it.”

It’s unclear whether Arsenal will sack Sminter in light of this revelation, but he feels he still has much to offer the club.

“No other physio can finish the 100,000 piece jigsaw puzzle I started with Jack Wilshere or convince Olivier Giroud that eating coins will make him run faster,” Sminter concluded. “I think trouble on the pitch is a small price to pay for lasting memories in the physio’s room. And isn’t that what football is really all about?”

This has been Future News: news from the future.

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Brooks Peck is the editor of Dirty Tackle on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him or follow on Twitter!